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Middle East and other Futurisms: Imaginary temporalities in contemporary art and visual culture

Middle East and other Futurisms: Imaginary temporalities in contemporary art and visual culture
Middle East and other Futurisms: Imaginary temporalities in contemporary art and visual culture
This article focuses on recent contemporary art of Gulf Futurism and Arab Futurism with a specific geographical focus on the Near and Middle East. Still only occasionally addressed and analysed in contemporary academic discussions, these art discourses and practices can be understood as particular forms of counterfuturisms and cultural politics of imaginary times; they continue the earlier work of Afrofuturism in using an aesthetic repertoire to complicate normalised notions of time and technology but in an alternative geopolitical context. Some of the analysed works such as Larissa Sansour’s films outline political questions about territories and architectures of control but these are also other contexts that address how experience of time is being infrastructured in material media culture. The article analyses these post-colonial artistic practices in dialogue with contemporary theoretical debate about cultural politics of time including the discourses about cancellation of future (Berardi) as well as the idea of counterfuturisms as a form of audiovisual practice.
1473-5784
40-58
Parikka, Jussi
cf75ecb3-3559-4e53-a03e-af511651e9ac
Parikka, Jussi
cf75ecb3-3559-4e53-a03e-af511651e9ac

Parikka, Jussi (2018) Middle East and other Futurisms: Imaginary temporalities in contemporary art and visual culture Culture, Theory and Critique, 59, (1), pp. 40-58. (doi:10.1080/14735784.2017.1410439).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This article focuses on recent contemporary art of Gulf Futurism and Arab Futurism with a specific geographical focus on the Near and Middle East. Still only occasionally addressed and analysed in contemporary academic discussions, these art discourses and practices can be understood as particular forms of counterfuturisms and cultural politics of imaginary times; they continue the earlier work of Afrofuturism in using an aesthetic repertoire to complicate normalised notions of time and technology but in an alternative geopolitical context. Some of the analysed works such as Larissa Sansour’s films outline political questions about territories and architectures of control but these are also other contexts that address how experience of time is being infrastructured in material media culture. The article analyses these post-colonial artistic practices in dialogue with contemporary theoretical debate about cultural politics of time including the discourses about cancellation of future (Berardi) as well as the idea of counterfuturisms as a form of audiovisual practice.

Text Parikka article copyedited and accepted - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 24 November 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 28 December 2017
Published date: 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 416032
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/416032
ISSN: 1473-5784
PURE UUID: 07e773d6-6e67-40b0-abf2-8a0e52d6e32e

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Date deposited: 30 Nov 2017 17:30
Last modified: 12 Feb 2018 17:30

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Author: Jussi Parikka

University divisions

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