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Is partially automated driving a bad idea? Observations from an on-road study

Is partially automated driving a bad idea? Observations from an on-road study
Is partially automated driving a bad idea? Observations from an on-road study
The automation of longitudinal and lateral control has enabled drivers to become “hands and feet free” but they are required to remain in an active monitoring state with a requirement to resume manual control if required. This represents the single largest allocation of system function problem with vehicle automation as the literature suggests that humans are notoriously inefficient at completing prolonged monitoring tasks. To further explore whether partially automated driving solutions can appropriately support the driver in completing their new monitoring role, video observations were collected as part of an on-road study using a Tesla Model S being operated in Autopilot mode. A thematic analysis of video data suggests that drivers are not being properly supported in adhering to their new monitoring responsibilities and instead demonstrate behaviour indicative of complacency and over-trust. These attributes may encourage drivers to take more risks whilst out on the road.
0003-6870
138-145
Banks, Victoria A.
0dbdcad0-c654-4b87-a804-6a7548d0196d
Eriksson, Alexander
75015c12-48a6-41ac-8fc4-15b1d71237f3
O'Donoghue, Jim
69353f56-aa98-40d3-b5f9-d501a7f005e2
Stanton, Neville A.
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Banks, Victoria A.
0dbdcad0-c654-4b87-a804-6a7548d0196d
Eriksson, Alexander
75015c12-48a6-41ac-8fc4-15b1d71237f3
O'Donoghue, Jim
69353f56-aa98-40d3-b5f9-d501a7f005e2
Stanton, Neville A.
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd

Banks, Victoria A., Eriksson, Alexander, O'Donoghue, Jim and Stanton, Neville A. (2018) Is partially automated driving a bad idea? Observations from an on-road study Applied Ergonomics, 68, pp. 138-145. (doi:10.1016/j.apergo.2017.11.010).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The automation of longitudinal and lateral control has enabled drivers to become “hands and feet free” but they are required to remain in an active monitoring state with a requirement to resume manual control if required. This represents the single largest allocation of system function problem with vehicle automation as the literature suggests that humans are notoriously inefficient at completing prolonged monitoring tasks. To further explore whether partially automated driving solutions can appropriately support the driver in completing their new monitoring role, video observations were collected as part of an on-road study using a Tesla Model S being operated in Autopilot mode. A thematic analysis of video data suggests that drivers are not being properly supported in adhering to their new monitoring responsibilities and instead demonstrate behaviour indicative of complacency and over-trust. These attributes may encourage drivers to take more risks whilst out on the road.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 13 November 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 22 November 2017
Published date: April 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 416066
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/416066
ISSN: 0003-6870
PURE UUID: 12f67e28-d62b-47ba-98b5-6218073e7f64
ORCID for Alexander Eriksson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1549-1327

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 01 Dec 2017 17:30
Last modified: 01 Dec 2017 17:30

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