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Aerodynamics of surface-mounted ribs

Aerodynamics of surface-mounted ribs
Aerodynamics of surface-mounted ribs
The flow over ribs consists of a forward-facing step followed by a backward-facing step. The interaction between the aerodynamics of these two canonical obstacles leads to complex patterns in an oscillating flow which depend on rib length. In order to study the aerodynamics of ribs, four steps were taken which involve multiple forms of velocity and pressure measurements. To begin, a method to estimate pressure fields from particle image velocimetry is applied and validated against pressure measurements. This provides pressure information necessary for the rest of the study. Second, the characteristics of the flow over ribs of varying length are studied in a statistical sense. Trends identified in previous work were found and extended to new quantities. The effect of free-stream turbulence on the characteristics of the flow is studied. It highlights the sensitivity of separation over short obstacles to free-stream turbulence in contrast with the unchanging separation over longer obstacles. Finally, the relationship between pressure and velocity is described using modelling of velocity components from surface pressure information. It shows that individual patterns in velocity fluctuations such as vortex shedding and shear layer flapping are closely linked to surface pressure fluctuations.
University of Southampton
Van Der Kindere, Jacques
dc7f8bd2-8112-489b-8c9a-b698139eeebb
Van Der Kindere, Jacques
dc7f8bd2-8112-489b-8c9a-b698139eeebb
Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram
5e69099f-2f39-4fdd-8a85-3ac906827052

Van Der Kindere, Jacques (2017) Aerodynamics of surface-mounted ribs. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 178pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

The flow over ribs consists of a forward-facing step followed by a backward-facing step. The interaction between the aerodynamics of these two canonical obstacles leads to complex patterns in an oscillating flow which depend on rib length. In order to study the aerodynamics of ribs, four steps were taken which involve multiple forms of velocity and pressure measurements. To begin, a method to estimate pressure fields from particle image velocimetry is applied and validated against pressure measurements. This provides pressure information necessary for the rest of the study. Second, the characteristics of the flow over ribs of varying length are studied in a statistical sense. Trends identified in previous work were found and extended to new quantities. The effect of free-stream turbulence on the characteristics of the flow is studied. It highlights the sensitivity of separation over short obstacles to free-stream turbulence in contrast with the unchanging separation over longer obstacles. Finally, the relationship between pressure and velocity is described using modelling of velocity components from surface pressure information. It shows that individual patterns in velocity fluctuations such as vortex shedding and shear layer flapping are closely linked to surface pressure fluctuations.

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FINAL E-THESIS FOR E-PRINTS VAN DER KINDERE 23514299 - Accepted Manuscript
Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.
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Published date: July 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 416112
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/416112
PURE UUID: 44a28fbf-9944-4114-b8bd-990c20cf4792
ORCID for Bharathram Ganapathisubramani: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9817-0486

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Date deposited: 04 Dec 2017 17:30
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:37

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