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Neisseria meningitidis: clones, carriage, and disease

Neisseria meningitidis: clones, carriage, and disease
Neisseria meningitidis: clones, carriage, and disease

Neisseria meningitidis, the cause of meningococcal disease, has been the subject of sophisticated molecular epidemiological investigation as a consequence of the significant public health threat posed by this organism. The use of multilocus sequence typing and whole genome sequencing classifies the organism into clonal complexes. Extensive phenotypic, genotypic and epidemiological information is available on the PubMLST website. The human nasopharynx is the sole ecological niche of this species, and carrier isolates show extensive genetic diversity as compared with hyperinvasive lineages. Horizontal gene exchange and recombinant events within the meningococcal genome during residence in the human nasopharynx result in antigenic diversity even within clonal complexes, so that individual clones may express, for example, more than one capsular polysaccharide (serogroup). Successful clones are capable of wide global dissemination, and may be associated with explosive epidemics of invasive disease.

Bacterial Typing Techniques, Carrier State, Epidemics, Genome, Bacterial, Humans, Meningococcal Infections, Molecular Epidemiology, Multilocus Sequence Typing, Nasopharynx, Neisseria meningitidis, Phenotype, Serogroup, Journal Article, Review
1198-743X
391-395
Read, R.C.
b5caca7b-0063-438a-b703-7ecbb6fc2b51
Read, R.C.
b5caca7b-0063-438a-b703-7ecbb6fc2b51

Read, R.C. (2014) Neisseria meningitidis: clones, carriage, and disease. Clinical Microbiology and Infection, 20 (5), 391-395. (doi:10.1111/1469-0691.12647).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Neisseria meningitidis, the cause of meningococcal disease, has been the subject of sophisticated molecular epidemiological investigation as a consequence of the significant public health threat posed by this organism. The use of multilocus sequence typing and whole genome sequencing classifies the organism into clonal complexes. Extensive phenotypic, genotypic and epidemiological information is available on the PubMLST website. The human nasopharynx is the sole ecological niche of this species, and carrier isolates show extensive genetic diversity as compared with hyperinvasive lineages. Horizontal gene exchange and recombinant events within the meningococcal genome during residence in the human nasopharynx result in antigenic diversity even within clonal complexes, so that individual clones may express, for example, more than one capsular polysaccharide (serogroup). Successful clones are capable of wide global dissemination, and may be associated with explosive epidemics of invasive disease.

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More information

Published date: May 2014
Additional Information: © 2014 The Author Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2014 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.
Keywords: Bacterial Typing Techniques, Carrier State, Epidemics, Genome, Bacterial, Humans, Meningococcal Infections, Molecular Epidemiology, Multilocus Sequence Typing, Nasopharynx, Neisseria meningitidis, Phenotype, Serogroup, Journal Article, Review

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 416205
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/416205
ISSN: 1198-743X
PURE UUID: aabbcd31-7c38-4262-b2da-3cb6e3ea84d6
ORCID for R.C. Read: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4297-6728

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Dec 2017 17:30
Last modified: 07 Aug 2019 00:35

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