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Biogeochemistry, macronutrient and carbon cycling in the benthic layer, NERC

Biogeochemistry, macronutrient and carbon cycling in the benthic layer, NERC
Biogeochemistry, macronutrient and carbon cycling in the benthic layer, NERC
The coasts and shelf seas that surround us have been the focal point of human prosperity and well-being throughout our history and, consequently, have had a disproportionate effect on our culture. The societal importance of the shelf seas extends beyond food production to include biodiversity, carbon cycling and storage, waste disposal, nutrient cycling, recreation and renewable energy. Yet, as increasing proportions of the global population move closer to the coast, our seas have become progressively eroded by human activities, including overfishing, pollution, habitat disturbance and climate change. This is worrying because the condition of the seabed, biodiversity and human society are inextricably linked. Hence, there is an urgent need to understand the relative sensitivities of a range of shelf habitats so that human pressures can be managed more effectively to ensure the long-term sustainability of our seas and provision of societal benefits. Achieving these aims is not straightforward, as the capacity of the seabed to provide the goods and services we rely upon depends on local conditions; some habitats are naturally dynamic and relatively insensitive to disturbance, while others are comparatively stable and vulnerable to change. NERC and Defra have recently initiated a major new research programme - Shelf Sea Biogeochemistry (2011-2017) – that is documenting the sensitivity and status of seabed habitats around the UK based on their physical condition, the biological communities that inhabit them, and the size and dynamics of the nitrogen and carbon concentrations found there. Emerging results are already providing information on which areas of the UK seabed are most vulnerable to human activities and climate change, which will be of value to planners and policymakers.
Science Impact
Solan, Martin
c28b294a-1db6-4677-8eab-bd8d6221fecf
Godbold, Jasmin
df6da569-e7ea-43ca-8a95-a563829fb88a
Thompson, Charlotte
2a304aa6-761e-4d99-b227-cedb67129bfb
Ruhl, Henry
177608ef-7793-4911-86cf-cd9960ff22b6
Mayor, Daniel
55f90e04-de18-481a-8d76-b4514087f198
Cripps, Gemma
bb69f201-11cb-4b34-85b3-81720e0b6554
Solan, Martin
c28b294a-1db6-4677-8eab-bd8d6221fecf
Godbold, Jasmin
df6da569-e7ea-43ca-8a95-a563829fb88a
Thompson, Charlotte
2a304aa6-761e-4d99-b227-cedb67129bfb
Ruhl, Henry
177608ef-7793-4911-86cf-cd9960ff22b6
Mayor, Daniel
55f90e04-de18-481a-8d76-b4514087f198
Cripps, Gemma
bb69f201-11cb-4b34-85b3-81720e0b6554

Solan, Martin, Godbold, Jasmin, Thompson, Charlotte, Ruhl, Henry, Mayor, Daniel and Cripps, Gemma (2017) Biogeochemistry, macronutrient and carbon cycling in the benthic layer, NERC UK. Science Impact 5pp.

Record type: Monograph (Project Report)

Abstract

The coasts and shelf seas that surround us have been the focal point of human prosperity and well-being throughout our history and, consequently, have had a disproportionate effect on our culture. The societal importance of the shelf seas extends beyond food production to include biodiversity, carbon cycling and storage, waste disposal, nutrient cycling, recreation and renewable energy. Yet, as increasing proportions of the global population move closer to the coast, our seas have become progressively eroded by human activities, including overfishing, pollution, habitat disturbance and climate change. This is worrying because the condition of the seabed, biodiversity and human society are inextricably linked. Hence, there is an urgent need to understand the relative sensitivities of a range of shelf habitats so that human pressures can be managed more effectively to ensure the long-term sustainability of our seas and provision of societal benefits. Achieving these aims is not straightforward, as the capacity of the seabed to provide the goods and services we rely upon depends on local conditions; some habitats are naturally dynamic and relatively insensitive to disturbance, while others are comparatively stable and vulnerable to change. NERC and Defra have recently initiated a major new research programme - Shelf Sea Biogeochemistry (2011-2017) – that is documenting the sensitivity and status of seabed habitats around the UK based on their physical condition, the biological communities that inhabit them, and the size and dynamics of the nitrogen and carbon concentrations found there. Emerging results are already providing information on which areas of the UK seabed are most vulnerable to human activities and climate change, which will be of value to planners and policymakers.

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More information

Published date: September 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 416250
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/416250
PURE UUID: e3546dce-9d16-44f1-a22c-b85c03b1920d
ORCID for Martin Solan: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9924-5574
ORCID for Jasmin Godbold: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5558-8188

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Dec 2017 17:30
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:39

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Contributors

Author: Martin Solan ORCID iD
Author: Jasmin Godbold ORCID iD
Author: Henry Ruhl
Author: Daniel Mayor
Author: Gemma Cripps

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