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Revisiting the question of ‘what is CSR?’: the implicit/explicit dichotomy

Revisiting the question of ‘what is CSR?’: the implicit/explicit dichotomy
Revisiting the question of ‘what is CSR?’: the implicit/explicit dichotomy
Background: Much of the research and scholarship in the field of CSR has been plagued by the issue of what CSR is. The most cited definition is Carroll’s pyramid of CSR (1999) which proposes four responsibilities of business: economic, legal, ethical and philanthropic. Yet some have debated how philanthropy can be realistically conceived as a responsibility when most are agreed, including Carroll himself, that philanthropy is a discretionary activity (Baden and Harwood, 2013). Such potential dichotomies suggest that what is required is an adapted approach to how CSR is defined. In this paper we draw upon our recent case study research to shed light on, if not actually resolve, this terminological ambiguity. The research develops an implicit (tacit) / explicit (codified) framework of CSR that is adapted from Matten and Moon’s implicit / explicit institutional framework (Matten and Moon, 2008).
Baden, Denise
daad83b9-c537-4d3c-bab6-548b841f23b5
Baden, Denise
daad83b9-c537-4d3c-bab6-548b841f23b5

Baden, Denise (2017) Revisiting the question of ‘what is CSR?’: the implicit/explicit dichotomy. 6th International Conference on Social Responsibility, Ethics and Sustainable Business, Berlin, Germany. 28 - 29 Sep 2017.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Background: Much of the research and scholarship in the field of CSR has been plagued by the issue of what CSR is. The most cited definition is Carroll’s pyramid of CSR (1999) which proposes four responsibilities of business: economic, legal, ethical and philanthropic. Yet some have debated how philanthropy can be realistically conceived as a responsibility when most are agreed, including Carroll himself, that philanthropy is a discretionary activity (Baden and Harwood, 2013). Such potential dichotomies suggest that what is required is an adapted approach to how CSR is defined. In this paper we draw upon our recent case study research to shed light on, if not actually resolve, this terminological ambiguity. The research develops an implicit (tacit) / explicit (codified) framework of CSR that is adapted from Matten and Moon’s implicit / explicit institutional framework (Matten and Moon, 2008).

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More information

Published date: September 2017
Venue - Dates: 6th International Conference on Social Responsibility, Ethics and Sustainable Business, Berlin, Germany, 2017-09-28 - 2017-09-29

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Local EPrints ID: 416261
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/416261
PURE UUID: bb156e23-316f-4afa-9a28-66532c21cb2f

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Date deposited: 11 Dec 2017 17:30
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 19:08

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Contributors

Author: Denise Baden

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