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Longitudinal profiling of the lung microbiome in the AERIS study demonstrates repeatability of bacterial and eosinophilic COPD exacerbations

Longitudinal profiling of the lung microbiome in the AERIS study demonstrates repeatability of bacterial and eosinophilic COPD exacerbations
Longitudinal profiling of the lung microbiome in the AERIS study demonstrates repeatability of bacterial and eosinophilic COPD exacerbations
Background: Alterations in the composition of the lung microbiome associated with adverse clinical outcomes, known as dysbiosis, have been implicated with disease severity and exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Objective: To characterize longitudinal changes in the lung microbiome in the AERIS study (Acute Exacerbation and Respiratory Infections in COPD) and their relationship with associated COPD outcomes.

Methods: We surveyed 584 sputum samples from 101 COPD patients to analyze the lung microbiome at both stable and exacerbation time points over one year using highthroughput sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. We incorporated additional lung microbiology, blood markers, and in-depth clinical assessments to classify COPD phenotypes.

Results: The stability of the lung microbiome over time was more likely to be decreased in exacerbations and within individuals with higher exacerbation frequencies. Analysis of exacerbation phenotypes using a Markov chain model revealed that bacterial and eosinophilic exacerbations were more likely to be repeated in subsequent exacerbations within a subject, whereas viral exacerbations were not more likely to be repeated. We also confirmed the association of bacterial genera, including Haemophilus and Moraxella, with disease severity, exacerbation events, and bronchiectasis.

Conclusions: Subtypes of COPD have distinct bacterial compositions and stabilities over time. Some exacerbation subtypes have non-random probabilities of repeating those subtypes in the future. This study provides insights pertaining to the identification of bacterial targets in the lung and biomarkers to classify COPD subtypes and to determine appropriate treatments for the patient.
0040-6376
422-430
Mayhew, David
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Devos, Nathalie
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Lambert, Christoph
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Brown, James R.
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Clarke, Stuart
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Kim, Viktoriya
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Magid-Slav, Michal
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Miller, Bruce E.
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Ostridge, Kristoffer
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Patel, Ruchi
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Sathe, Ganesh
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Simola, Daniel F.
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Staples, Karl J.
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Sung, Ruby
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Tal-Singer, Ruth M.
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Tuck, Andrew C.
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Van Horn, Stephanie
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Weynants, Vincent
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Williams, Nicholas
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Devaster, Jeanne-Marie
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Wilkinson, Tom M.
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Mayhew, David
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Devos, Nathalie
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Lambert, Christoph
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Brown, James R.
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Clarke, Stuart
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Kim, Viktoriya
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Magid-Slav, Michal
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Miller, Bruce E.
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Ostridge, Kristoffer
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Patel, Ruchi
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Sathe, Ganesh
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Simola, Daniel F.
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Staples, Karl J.
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Sung, Ruby
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Tal-Singer, Ruth M.
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Tuck, Andrew C.
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Van Horn, Stephanie
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Weynants, Vincent
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Williams, Nicholas
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Devaster, Jeanne-Marie
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Wilkinson, Tom M.
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Mayhew, David, Devos, Nathalie, Lambert, Christoph, Brown, James R., Clarke, Stuart, Kim, Viktoriya, Magid-Slav, Michal, Miller, Bruce E., Ostridge, Kristoffer, Patel, Ruchi, Sathe, Ganesh, Simola, Daniel F., Staples, Karl J., Sung, Ruby, Tal-Singer, Ruth M., Tuck, Andrew C., Van Horn, Stephanie, Weynants, Vincent, Williams, Nicholas, Devaster, Jeanne-Marie and Wilkinson, Tom M. (2018) Longitudinal profiling of the lung microbiome in the AERIS study demonstrates repeatability of bacterial and eosinophilic COPD exacerbations. Thorax, 73 (5), 422-430. (doi:10.1136/thoraxjnl-2017-210408).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Alterations in the composition of the lung microbiome associated with adverse clinical outcomes, known as dysbiosis, have been implicated with disease severity and exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Objective: To characterize longitudinal changes in the lung microbiome in the AERIS study (Acute Exacerbation and Respiratory Infections in COPD) and their relationship with associated COPD outcomes.

Methods: We surveyed 584 sputum samples from 101 COPD patients to analyze the lung microbiome at both stable and exacerbation time points over one year using highthroughput sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. We incorporated additional lung microbiology, blood markers, and in-depth clinical assessments to classify COPD phenotypes.

Results: The stability of the lung microbiome over time was more likely to be decreased in exacerbations and within individuals with higher exacerbation frequencies. Analysis of exacerbation phenotypes using a Markov chain model revealed that bacterial and eosinophilic exacerbations were more likely to be repeated in subsequent exacerbations within a subject, whereas viral exacerbations were not more likely to be repeated. We also confirmed the association of bacterial genera, including Haemophilus and Moraxella, with disease severity, exacerbation events, and bronchiectasis.

Conclusions: Subtypes of COPD have distinct bacterial compositions and stabilities over time. Some exacerbation subtypes have non-random probabilities of repeating those subtypes in the future. This study provides insights pertaining to the identification of bacterial targets in the lung and biomarkers to classify COPD subtypes and to determine appropriate treatments for the patient.

Text
Mayhew et al 2017 AERIS microbiome - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 5 December 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 31 January 2018
Published date: 16 April 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 416303
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/416303
ISSN: 0040-6376
PURE UUID: 4bb2ced3-c16e-4d3c-a862-9d5dcee69dbf
ORCID for Stuart Clarke: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7009-1548
ORCID for Karl J. Staples: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3844-6457

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Dec 2017 17:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 05:08

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Contributors

Author: David Mayhew
Author: Nathalie Devos
Author: Christoph Lambert
Author: James R. Brown
Author: Stuart Clarke ORCID iD
Author: Viktoriya Kim
Author: Michal Magid-Slav
Author: Bruce E. Miller
Author: Kristoffer Ostridge
Author: Ruchi Patel
Author: Ganesh Sathe
Author: Daniel F. Simola
Author: Karl J. Staples ORCID iD
Author: Ruby Sung
Author: Ruth M. Tal-Singer
Author: Andrew C. Tuck
Author: Stephanie Van Horn
Author: Vincent Weynants
Author: Nicholas Williams
Author: Jeanne-Marie Devaster

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