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Local deposition assisted laser-based direct-write method for fabrication of paper-based microfluidic devices

Local deposition assisted laser-based direct-write method for fabrication of paper-based microfluidic devices
Local deposition assisted laser-based direct-write method for fabrication of paper-based microfluidic devices
Demand for low-cost alternatives to conventional medical diagnostic tools has been the driving force that has spurred significant developments in the diagnostics field. Paper-based fluidic devices, proposed by the Whitesides’ group in 2007 have been regarded as one such alternative, and consequently, this field has been progressing rapidly.

In our previous works, we have demonstrated the usefulness and versatility of a laser direct-write (LDW) approach in the patterning of fluidic devices in porous materials such as cellulose for the fabrication of diagnostic devices. This lab-based non-lithographic approach with high flexibility has the potential to be up-scaled for mass-production of paper-based devices at affordable costs. A decrease in the total number of fabrication-steps would however not only make this LDW process more efficient as a consequence of reduced fabrication times, but would also make it more cost-effective because of the reduced usage of expensive reagent – translating it into a truly mature technique adoptable for commercial manufacture. To optimise our original technique, we propose the inclusion of a deposition tool that allows localised deposition of the photopolymer at only specific locations on the paper where the fluid containing wall/structures need to be formed within the substrates to create the microfluidic device. This selective photopolymer deposition eliminates the (global) soaking step required to impregnate the photopolymer within the paper, prior to the laser illumination step, and furthermore also makes redundant the subsequent solvent developing step inherent in our original technique.

Overall, we believe this optimised LDW technique is suitable for roll-to-roll manufacture of paper-based microfluidic devices that can be used for a variety of applications.
He, Peijun
2e303166-6aa5-4a09-b22e-440d96a54a9f
Katis, Ioannis
f92dfb8f-610d-4877-83f6-fd26a571df12
Eason, Robert
e38684c3-d18c-41b9-a4aa-def67283b020
Sones, Collin
9de9d8ee-d394-46a5-80b7-e341c0eed0a8
He, Peijun
2e303166-6aa5-4a09-b22e-440d96a54a9f
Katis, Ioannis
f92dfb8f-610d-4877-83f6-fd26a571df12
Eason, Robert
e38684c3-d18c-41b9-a4aa-def67283b020
Sones, Collin
9de9d8ee-d394-46a5-80b7-e341c0eed0a8

He, Peijun, Katis, Ioannis, Eason, Robert and Sones, Collin (2017) Local deposition assisted laser-based direct-write method for fabrication of paper-based microfluidic devices. 3rd Microfluidics Congress: Europe, United Kingdom. 05 - 06 Dec 2017.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)

Abstract

Demand for low-cost alternatives to conventional medical diagnostic tools has been the driving force that has spurred significant developments in the diagnostics field. Paper-based fluidic devices, proposed by the Whitesides’ group in 2007 have been regarded as one such alternative, and consequently, this field has been progressing rapidly.

In our previous works, we have demonstrated the usefulness and versatility of a laser direct-write (LDW) approach in the patterning of fluidic devices in porous materials such as cellulose for the fabrication of diagnostic devices. This lab-based non-lithographic approach with high flexibility has the potential to be up-scaled for mass-production of paper-based devices at affordable costs. A decrease in the total number of fabrication-steps would however not only make this LDW process more efficient as a consequence of reduced fabrication times, but would also make it more cost-effective because of the reduced usage of expensive reagent – translating it into a truly mature technique adoptable for commercial manufacture. To optimise our original technique, we propose the inclusion of a deposition tool that allows localised deposition of the photopolymer at only specific locations on the paper where the fluid containing wall/structures need to be formed within the substrates to create the microfluidic device. This selective photopolymer deposition eliminates the (global) soaking step required to impregnate the photopolymer within the paper, prior to the laser illumination step, and furthermore also makes redundant the subsequent solvent developing step inherent in our original technique.

Overall, we believe this optimised LDW technique is suitable for roll-to-roll manufacture of paper-based microfluidic devices that can be used for a variety of applications.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 4 December 2017
Venue - Dates: 3rd Microfluidics Congress: Europe, United Kingdom, 2017-12-05 - 2017-12-06

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 416328
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/416328
PURE UUID: ceead294-e1a1-46ec-8074-c139296e0d1b
ORCID for Ioannis Katis: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2016-557X
ORCID for Robert Eason: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9704-2204

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 13 Dec 2017 17:30
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:23

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