The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Laser manufactured paper devices for multiplexed detection of bacteria and their resistance to antibiotics

Laser manufactured paper devices for multiplexed detection of bacteria and their resistance to antibiotics
Laser manufactured paper devices for multiplexed detection of bacteria and their resistance to antibiotics
Drug resistant bacteria are a major health problem and the growing resistance to antibiotics in organisms such as Escherichia Coli and Staphylococcus aureus, poses a clinically significant challenge in hospital medicine. Early diagnosis and prompt antibiotic treatment of any such infection is important for clinical recovery and prevention of serious antimicrobial resistance (AMR) - a key objective of the World Health Organization. Current routine empirical antibiotic therapy protocol for diagnosis of such pathogens involves a preliminary laboratory-based bacterial culture testing using agar-plates which can take up to 2-3 days. However, if the specific microbe species causing an infection can be quickly identified earlier on, it will allow doctors to prescribe a specific targeted antimicrobial instead of using a broad spectrum antimicrobial.
We present here the use of paper devices patterned via a proprietary laser-based polymerisation technique for detection and susceptibility testing of bacterial pathogens. The technique allows the creation of hydrophobic barriers inside and on the surface of the paper, and therefore the creation of fluidic channels and test zones in many different shapes, sizes and patterns. The laser-based direct-write procedure is non-contact, non-lithographic and mask-less and uses a 405nm diode laser. The laser-structured paper can then be infused with chromogenic agars that allow the growth and detection of different bacteria. As shown in Fig. 1a, antibiotics can be added to the individual test zones therefore allowing for testing of the susceptibility/resistance of the bacteria such as MRSA and MSSA to those antibiotics. Using more complex designs and combinations of the growth media (Fig. 1b), multiplexed detection of different bacteria such as Staphylococcus and E.Coli can also be achieved in a single device. We envisage that these cheap and easy-to-use devices will serve as point-of-care analogues to the agar plates used routinely in pathological labs for detection of bacterial infections.
Katis, Ioannis
f92dfb8f-610d-4877-83f6-fd26a571df12
He, Peijun
2e303166-6aa5-4a09-b22e-440d96a54a9f
Sherwin, Susanna
1747dc67-a541-49b2-a15f-7e7f1c9a805b
Keevil, Charles
cb7de0a7-ce33-4cfa-af52-07f99e5650eb
Eason, Robert
e38684c3-d18c-41b9-a4aa-def67283b020
Sones, Collin
9de9d8ee-d394-46a5-80b7-e341c0eed0a8
Katis, Ioannis
f92dfb8f-610d-4877-83f6-fd26a571df12
He, Peijun
2e303166-6aa5-4a09-b22e-440d96a54a9f
Sherwin, Susanna
1747dc67-a541-49b2-a15f-7e7f1c9a805b
Keevil, Charles
cb7de0a7-ce33-4cfa-af52-07f99e5650eb
Eason, Robert
e38684c3-d18c-41b9-a4aa-def67283b020
Sones, Collin
9de9d8ee-d394-46a5-80b7-e341c0eed0a8

Katis, Ioannis, He, Peijun, Sherwin, Susanna, Keevil, Charles, Eason, Robert and Sones, Collin (2017) Laser manufactured paper devices for multiplexed detection of bacteria and their resistance to antibiotics. EUROMAT 2017: European Congress and Exhibition on Advanced Materials and Processes, Greece. 17 - 22 Sep 2017.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Drug resistant bacteria are a major health problem and the growing resistance to antibiotics in organisms such as Escherichia Coli and Staphylococcus aureus, poses a clinically significant challenge in hospital medicine. Early diagnosis and prompt antibiotic treatment of any such infection is important for clinical recovery and prevention of serious antimicrobial resistance (AMR) - a key objective of the World Health Organization. Current routine empirical antibiotic therapy protocol for diagnosis of such pathogens involves a preliminary laboratory-based bacterial culture testing using agar-plates which can take up to 2-3 days. However, if the specific microbe species causing an infection can be quickly identified earlier on, it will allow doctors to prescribe a specific targeted antimicrobial instead of using a broad spectrum antimicrobial.
We present here the use of paper devices patterned via a proprietary laser-based polymerisation technique for detection and susceptibility testing of bacterial pathogens. The technique allows the creation of hydrophobic barriers inside and on the surface of the paper, and therefore the creation of fluidic channels and test zones in many different shapes, sizes and patterns. The laser-based direct-write procedure is non-contact, non-lithographic and mask-less and uses a 405nm diode laser. The laser-structured paper can then be infused with chromogenic agars that allow the growth and detection of different bacteria. As shown in Fig. 1a, antibiotics can be added to the individual test zones therefore allowing for testing of the susceptibility/resistance of the bacteria such as MRSA and MSSA to those antibiotics. Using more complex designs and combinations of the growth media (Fig. 1b), multiplexed detection of different bacteria such as Staphylococcus and E.Coli can also be achieved in a single device. We envisage that these cheap and easy-to-use devices will serve as point-of-care analogues to the agar plates used routinely in pathological labs for detection of bacterial infections.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 17 September 2017
Venue - Dates: EUROMAT 2017: European Congress and Exhibition on Advanced Materials and Processes, Greece, 2017-09-17 - 2017-09-22

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 416362
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/416362
PURE UUID: 88920e3f-6ca4-4a17-ba1e-5ed20b83a6a4
ORCID for Ioannis Katis: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2016-557X
ORCID for Charles Keevil: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1917-7706
ORCID for Robert Eason: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9704-2204

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 Dec 2017 17:30
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:23

Export record

Contributors

Author: Ioannis Katis ORCID iD
Author: Peijun He
Author: Susanna Sherwin
Author: Charles Keevil ORCID iD
Author: Robert Eason ORCID iD
Author: Collin Sones

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×