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Positive and negative affect mediate the bidirectional relationship between emotional processing and symptom severity and impact in irritable bowel syndrome

Positive and negative affect mediate the bidirectional relationship between emotional processing and symptom severity and impact in irritable bowel syndrome
Positive and negative affect mediate the bidirectional relationship between emotional processing and symptom severity and impact in irritable bowel syndrome
Introduction
Individuals with IBS report higher levels of psychological distress compared to healthy controls. Distress has been associated with emotional processing difficulties but studies have not explored how the relationship between distress and emotional processing affects IBS. There is little research on the role of positive affect (PA) in IBS.

Aims
(a) If difficulties in self-reported emotional processing are associated with affect and IBS measures (i.e., symptom severity, interference in life roles) (b1) If affect mediates the relationship between emotional processing and IBS measures (b2) Alternative model: if affect mediates the relationship between IBS and emotional processing (c) If PA moderates the relationship between distress and IBS.

Methods
Participants with a confirmed diagnosis of IBS (n = 558) completed a questionnaire including measures of emotional processing (i.e., unhelpful beliefs about negative emotions, impoverished emotional experience), distress, PA, and IBS symptoms/interference. Mediation and moderation analyses were conducted with Maximum Likelihood Estimation.

Results
Distress and PA mediated or partly mediated the relationship between unhelpful beliefs about negative emotions/impoverished emotional experience and both IBS measures. The alternative models were also valid, suggesting a two-way relationship between emotional processing and IBS through affect. PA did not moderate the relationship between distress and IBS.

Conclusion
Future interventions in IBS may benefit from not only targeting the management of physical symptoms and their daily impact but also aspects related to the experience of both negative and positive affect, and the acceptance and expression of negative emotions. Longitudinal studies are needed to confirm causal relationships within the explored models.
0022-3999
1-13
Sibelli, Alice
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Chalder, Trudie
cb09653b-2c1e-4dfc-bb13-c6e8ca918602
Everitt, Hazel
80b9452f-9632-45a8-b017-ceeeee6971ef
Chilcot, Joseph
8629be02-350f-4ad4-afaf-11879b2c38a2
Moss-Morris, Rona
a502f58a-d319-49a6-8aea-9dde4efc871e
Sibelli, Alice
64b9c97c-3cf9-4915-8af0-c40b7805a8f1
Chalder, Trudie
cb09653b-2c1e-4dfc-bb13-c6e8ca918602
Everitt, Hazel
80b9452f-9632-45a8-b017-ceeeee6971ef
Chilcot, Joseph
8629be02-350f-4ad4-afaf-11879b2c38a2
Moss-Morris, Rona
a502f58a-d319-49a6-8aea-9dde4efc871e

Sibelli, Alice, Chalder, Trudie, Everitt, Hazel, Chilcot, Joseph and Moss-Morris, Rona (2018) Positive and negative affect mediate the bidirectional relationship between emotional processing and symptom severity and impact in irritable bowel syndrome. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 105, 1-13. (doi:10.1016/j.jpsychores.2017.11.016).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Introduction
Individuals with IBS report higher levels of psychological distress compared to healthy controls. Distress has been associated with emotional processing difficulties but studies have not explored how the relationship between distress and emotional processing affects IBS. There is little research on the role of positive affect (PA) in IBS.

Aims
(a) If difficulties in self-reported emotional processing are associated with affect and IBS measures (i.e., symptom severity, interference in life roles) (b1) If affect mediates the relationship between emotional processing and IBS measures (b2) Alternative model: if affect mediates the relationship between IBS and emotional processing (c) If PA moderates the relationship between distress and IBS.

Methods
Participants with a confirmed diagnosis of IBS (n = 558) completed a questionnaire including measures of emotional processing (i.e., unhelpful beliefs about negative emotions, impoverished emotional experience), distress, PA, and IBS symptoms/interference. Mediation and moderation analyses were conducted with Maximum Likelihood Estimation.

Results
Distress and PA mediated or partly mediated the relationship between unhelpful beliefs about negative emotions/impoverished emotional experience and both IBS measures. The alternative models were also valid, suggesting a two-way relationship between emotional processing and IBS through affect. PA did not moderate the relationship between distress and IBS.

Conclusion
Future interventions in IBS may benefit from not only targeting the management of physical symptoms and their daily impact but also aspects related to the experience of both negative and positive affect, and the acceptance and expression of negative emotions. Longitudinal studies are needed to confirm causal relationships within the explored models.

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Sibellietal_mediation_EP_affect_IBS_accepted - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 28 November 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 29 November 2017
Published date: February 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 416367
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/416367
ISSN: 0022-3999
PURE UUID: d5e29f31-c6c5-41df-8f62-82b4333f9605
ORCID for Hazel Everitt: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7362-8403

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 Dec 2017 17:30
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 05:44

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