The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Toll-like receptors in health and disease: complex questions remain

Toll-like receptors in health and disease: complex questions remain
Toll-like receptors in health and disease: complex questions remain
Until recently, the manner in which we respond to pathogens was obscure. It is now clear that a family of proteins, the Toll-like receptors (TLRs),3 contribute to the signal transduction induced by many pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), and perhaps also to endogenous damage signals generated at sites of inflammation. Some TLRs act as central integrators of a wide variety of signals, responding to diverse agonists with an apparently common output, while other members of the family show (to date) considerable specificity with regard to their stimuli. However, many questions remain regarding the immunopharmacology of TLRs, their roles in innate immunity, and their manipulation by pathogens.
Animals, Humans, Immunity, Innate, Infection, Membrane Glycoproteins, Receptors, Cell Surface, Signal Transduction, Toll-Like Receptors, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S., Review
0022-1767
1630-1635
Sabroe, Ian
4de1d7fc-f0f1-485c-8af3-7f67af94bd36
Read, Robert C.
b5caca7b-0063-438a-b703-7ecbb6fc2b51
Whyte, Moira K.B.
fed8c25b-ced7-4a16-89f3-b93208a63a18
Dockrell, David H.
a068c9bf-35b8-4c10-8f91-58639cfeca0b
Vogel, Stefanie N.
a430fd34-a60c-4969-9ba0-bc34d28d2e13
Dower, Steven K.
c59b6ed1-57d4-49cb-815c-038a96601ecc
Sabroe, Ian
4de1d7fc-f0f1-485c-8af3-7f67af94bd36
Read, Robert C.
b5caca7b-0063-438a-b703-7ecbb6fc2b51
Whyte, Moira K.B.
fed8c25b-ced7-4a16-89f3-b93208a63a18
Dockrell, David H.
a068c9bf-35b8-4c10-8f91-58639cfeca0b
Vogel, Stefanie N.
a430fd34-a60c-4969-9ba0-bc34d28d2e13
Dower, Steven K.
c59b6ed1-57d4-49cb-815c-038a96601ecc

Sabroe, Ian, Read, Robert C., Whyte, Moira K.B., Dockrell, David H., Vogel, Stefanie N. and Dower, Steven K. (2003) Toll-like receptors in health and disease: complex questions remain. Journal of Immunology, 171 (4), 1630-1635. (doi:10.4049/jimmunol.171.4.1630).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Until recently, the manner in which we respond to pathogens was obscure. It is now clear that a family of proteins, the Toll-like receptors (TLRs),3 contribute to the signal transduction induced by many pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), and perhaps also to endogenous damage signals generated at sites of inflammation. Some TLRs act as central integrators of a wide variety of signals, responding to diverse agonists with an apparently common output, while other members of the family show (to date) considerable specificity with regard to their stimuli. However, many questions remain regarding the immunopharmacology of TLRs, their roles in innate immunity, and their manipulation by pathogens.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 15 August 2003
Keywords: Animals, Humans, Immunity, Innate, Infection, Membrane Glycoproteins, Receptors, Cell Surface, Signal Transduction, Toll-Like Receptors, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S., Review

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 416417
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/416417
ISSN: 0022-1767
PURE UUID: cba158ae-cb80-4d83-b8cb-f467194532bb
ORCID for Robert C. Read: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4297-6728

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Dec 2017 17:30
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:18

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Ian Sabroe
Author: Robert C. Read ORCID iD
Author: Moira K.B. Whyte
Author: David H. Dockrell
Author: Stefanie N. Vogel
Author: Steven K. Dower

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×