The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

In rural Gambia, do adolescents have increased nutritional vulnerability compared to adults?

In rural Gambia, do adolescents have increased nutritional vulnerability compared to adults?
In rural Gambia, do adolescents have increased nutritional vulnerability compared to adults?
Adolescents may be particularly susceptible to malnutrition due to the energy and nutrient costs of the pubertal growth spurt. The aim of this study was to compare differences in selected markers of nutritional status between adolescents and adults in rural Gambia.

The Keneba Biobank collects cross-sectional data and samples for all consenting individuals resident in the West Kiang region of The Gambia. For this study, participants between the ages of 10 and 40 years (y) were selected (n = 4201, female 2447). Height, body mass index, body composition, haemoglobin concentration, fasting glucose concentration and blood pressure were compared using linear regression models adjusting for age, parity, season of measurement and residence, across three age groups: early adolescent (10-14.9y), late adolescent (15-19.9y) and adult (20-39.9y).

Adolescents, particularly early adolescent girls and boys, were shorter, lighter and leaner than adults. By late adolescence differences were smaller, particularly in girls where, notably, the prevalence of overweight, hypertension and impaired fasting glucose was low. Given the importance of maternal health for reproductive outcomes and intergenerational health, the results of the study, albeit with limited biomarkers available, indicate adolescent girls are no more compromised than adult women or males from the same population.
0077-8923
Schoenbuchner, S.M.
e20c0f65-3133-4598-9e3b-fc0f95551f11
Moore, Sophie E
bea65f65-3f11-45cd-96d2-c088a18ccc55
Johnson, William
5107641f-ac1c-4f74-8980-9bd71d4282fd
Ngum, Mohammed
a73f31d9-2929-41e6-9859-2fbc44e3fd23
Sonko, Bakary
e624cf3e-51d2-4d9f-bccd-11da81ace7f1
Prentice, Ann
675810ad-8022-453c-b3a3-8afff0e1a920
Prentice, Andrew M.
6b851f61-f989-48f6-8109-9a7408254728
Ward, Kathryn
39bd4db1-c948-4e32-930e-7bec8deb54c7
Schoenbuchner, S.M.
e20c0f65-3133-4598-9e3b-fc0f95551f11
Moore, Sophie E
bea65f65-3f11-45cd-96d2-c088a18ccc55
Johnson, William
5107641f-ac1c-4f74-8980-9bd71d4282fd
Ngum, Mohammed
a73f31d9-2929-41e6-9859-2fbc44e3fd23
Sonko, Bakary
e624cf3e-51d2-4d9f-bccd-11da81ace7f1
Prentice, Ann
675810ad-8022-453c-b3a3-8afff0e1a920
Prentice, Andrew M.
6b851f61-f989-48f6-8109-9a7408254728
Ward, Kathryn
39bd4db1-c948-4e32-930e-7bec8deb54c7

Schoenbuchner, S.M., Moore, Sophie E, Johnson, William, Ngum, Mohammed, Sonko, Bakary, Prentice, Ann, Prentice, Andrew M. and Ward, Kathryn (2018) In rural Gambia, do adolescents have increased nutritional vulnerability compared to adults? Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. (doi:10.1111/nyas.13587).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Adolescents may be particularly susceptible to malnutrition due to the energy and nutrient costs of the pubertal growth spurt. The aim of this study was to compare differences in selected markers of nutritional status between adolescents and adults in rural Gambia.

The Keneba Biobank collects cross-sectional data and samples for all consenting individuals resident in the West Kiang region of The Gambia. For this study, participants between the ages of 10 and 40 years (y) were selected (n = 4201, female 2447). Height, body mass index, body composition, haemoglobin concentration, fasting glucose concentration and blood pressure were compared using linear regression models adjusting for age, parity, season of measurement and residence, across three age groups: early adolescent (10-14.9y), late adolescent (15-19.9y) and adult (20-39.9y).

Adolescents, particularly early adolescent girls and boys, were shorter, lighter and leaner than adults. By late adolescence differences were smaller, particularly in girls where, notably, the prevalence of overweight, hypertension and impaired fasting glucose was low. Given the importance of maternal health for reproductive outcomes and intergenerational health, the results of the study, albeit with limited biomarkers available, indicate adolescent girls are no more compromised than adult women or males from the same population.

Text
Biobank R1 20-11-17 no track (002) - Accepted Manuscript
Download (93kB)
Text
Table 1
Download (28kB)
Text
Table 2
Download (18kB)
Text
Z-Scores
Download (852kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 4 December 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 25 March 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 416462
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/416462
ISSN: 0077-8923
PURE UUID: 8e347505-cba6-4778-a461-fa3023744dfe
ORCID for Kathryn Ward: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7034-6750

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Dec 2017 17:30
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 04:38

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×