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Explaining the differences in household food waste collection and treatment provisions between local authorities in England and Wales

Explaining the differences in household food waste collection and treatment provisions between local authorities in England and Wales
Explaining the differences in household food waste collection and treatment provisions between local authorities in England and Wales
Separate household food waste collection for anaerobic digestion is one method used in the sustainable management of biodegradable municipal solid waste (MSW). Recycling of food waste contributes to the UK’s reuse, recycling and composting targets and can help local authorities boost plateauing rates whilst encouraging landfill diversion. This study explored the reasons for differences in the provision of food waste collections, using two comparable local authorities, one with a collection in Wales (Cardiff), and the other absent of such service in England (Southampton). A PESTLE analysis investigated the political, economic, social, technological, legal and environmental impacts of separate food waste collections. The greenhouse gas impacts of the collection and treatment systems of MSW in both cities were estimated for 2012/13. Results showed significant policy and legislative differences between devolved
governments, that separate food waste collections can save local authorities significant sums of money and substantially reduce greenhouse gas impacts. A survey of one hundred respondents in each city aimed to understand attitudes and behaviours towards recycling, food waste segregation, cooking and purchasing habits. The number of frequent recyclers and levels of satisfaction were higher in the authority which provided a separate food waste collection. In the area which lacked a separate collection service, over three-quarters of respondents would participate in such a scheme if it were available.
Food waste, local authority, collection, recycling, greenhouse gas, municipal solid waste
0956-053X
222-235
Bees, A.D.
4f1a1ea9-0dd8-44d4-a12a-bc8b9aa3e886
Williams, I.D.
c9d674ac-ee69-4937-ab43-17e716266e22
Bees, A.D.
4f1a1ea9-0dd8-44d4-a12a-bc8b9aa3e886
Williams, I.D.
c9d674ac-ee69-4937-ab43-17e716266e22

Bees, A.D. and Williams, I.D. (2017) Explaining the differences in household food waste collection and treatment provisions between local authorities in England and Wales. Waste Management, 70, 222-235. (doi:10.1016/j.wasman.2017.09.004).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Separate household food waste collection for anaerobic digestion is one method used in the sustainable management of biodegradable municipal solid waste (MSW). Recycling of food waste contributes to the UK’s reuse, recycling and composting targets and can help local authorities boost plateauing rates whilst encouraging landfill diversion. This study explored the reasons for differences in the provision of food waste collections, using two comparable local authorities, one with a collection in Wales (Cardiff), and the other absent of such service in England (Southampton). A PESTLE analysis investigated the political, economic, social, technological, legal and environmental impacts of separate food waste collections. The greenhouse gas impacts of the collection and treatment systems of MSW in both cities were estimated for 2012/13. Results showed significant policy and legislative differences between devolved
governments, that separate food waste collections can save local authorities significant sums of money and substantially reduce greenhouse gas impacts. A survey of one hundred respondents in each city aimed to understand attitudes and behaviours towards recycling, food waste segregation, cooking and purchasing habits. The number of frequent recyclers and levels of satisfaction were higher in the authority which provided a separate food waste collection. In the area which lacked a separate collection service, over three-quarters of respondents would participate in such a scheme if it were available.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 3 September 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 14 September 2017
Published date: December 2017
Keywords: Food waste, local authority, collection, recycling, greenhouse gas, municipal solid waste

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 416534
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/416534
ISSN: 0956-053X
PURE UUID: 1156a58a-9aee-44fd-8790-65a9f83da6be
ORCID for I.D. Williams: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0121-1219

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Dec 2017 17:30
Last modified: 15 Aug 2019 00:44

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