The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Metal accumulation and metallothionein response in Fucus spiralis

Metal accumulation and metallothionein response in Fucus spiralis
Metal accumulation and metallothionein response in Fucus spiralis
Seaweeds are established sentinels for metal contamination and are utilised for biomonitoring. Metallothionein (MT) is a protein that is induced by metal exposure, and has been widely used as a biomarker for metal pollution. MT has not been reported in spiral wrack (Fucus spiralis), but has been identified in bladder wrack (Fucus vesiculosus), where it has been suggested as a protective mechanism against metal exposure. This study aimed to evaluate the potential use of MT in F. spiralis as a biomarker for metal pollution for the first time. Samples were collected from Poole Harbour, UK, over a year-long period, from January to October 2015. MT and metal concentrations were quantified during winter, spring, summer, and autumn seasons. Linear regression analysis showed few relationships between MT and metal concentrations, apart from in summer. During summer, significant positive relationships existed between MT concentrations and iron (R2 = 0.631), nickel (R2 = 0.486), tin (R2 = 0.579), and lead (R2 = 0.415). It is possible that for most of the year, metal concentrations in Poole Harbour are not high enough to elicit a MT response in F. spiralis, as it is a metal tolerant species. However, during summer, rates of photosynthesis and growth increase, which may increase metal toxicity, due to the inhibition of photosynthesis and growth. Thus, MT may be induced in order to prevent disruption. This study suggests that the use of MT as a biomarker for metal pollution in F. spiralis may not be a sensitive biomarker at low levels of metal pollution. However, MT concentrations in F. spiralis may respond to metal exposure when natural processes are vulnerable to pollution. The potential for MT to be used as a biomarker in Fucus spp. has been highlighted, warranting further research to develop a promising cosmopolitan bioindicator for metal pollution.
metallothionein, metal toxicity, Biomonitoring, brown seaweed, Fucus spiralis
1929-2732
1-14
Oaten, J.F.P.
523dd2e9-6fbd-4bc0-bcb9-72a1627926b5
Gibson, M.C.
1d6350e7-917a-414b-a3ff-b30dffc72c49
Hudson, M.D.
1ae18506-6f2a-48af-8c72-83ab28679f55
Jensen, A.C.
ff1cabd2-e6fa-4e34-9a39-5097e2bc5f85
Williams, I.D.
c9d674ac-ee69-4937-ab43-17e716266e22
Oaten, J.F.P.
523dd2e9-6fbd-4bc0-bcb9-72a1627926b5
Gibson, M.C.
1d6350e7-917a-414b-a3ff-b30dffc72c49
Hudson, M.D.
1ae18506-6f2a-48af-8c72-83ab28679f55
Jensen, A.C.
ff1cabd2-e6fa-4e34-9a39-5097e2bc5f85
Williams, I.D.
c9d674ac-ee69-4937-ab43-17e716266e22

Oaten, J.F.P., Gibson, M.C., Hudson, M.D., Jensen, A.C. and Williams, I.D. (2017) Metal accumulation and metallothionein response in Fucus spiralis. International Journal of Environmental Pollution and Remediation, 5, 1-14. (doi:10.11159/ijepr.2017.001).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Seaweeds are established sentinels for metal contamination and are utilised for biomonitoring. Metallothionein (MT) is a protein that is induced by metal exposure, and has been widely used as a biomarker for metal pollution. MT has not been reported in spiral wrack (Fucus spiralis), but has been identified in bladder wrack (Fucus vesiculosus), where it has been suggested as a protective mechanism against metal exposure. This study aimed to evaluate the potential use of MT in F. spiralis as a biomarker for metal pollution for the first time. Samples were collected from Poole Harbour, UK, over a year-long period, from January to October 2015. MT and metal concentrations were quantified during winter, spring, summer, and autumn seasons. Linear regression analysis showed few relationships between MT and metal concentrations, apart from in summer. During summer, significant positive relationships existed between MT concentrations and iron (R2 = 0.631), nickel (R2 = 0.486), tin (R2 = 0.579), and lead (R2 = 0.415). It is possible that for most of the year, metal concentrations in Poole Harbour are not high enough to elicit a MT response in F. spiralis, as it is a metal tolerant species. However, during summer, rates of photosynthesis and growth increase, which may increase metal toxicity, due to the inhibition of photosynthesis and growth. Thus, MT may be induced in order to prevent disruption. This study suggests that the use of MT as a biomarker for metal pollution in F. spiralis may not be a sensitive biomarker at low levels of metal pollution. However, MT concentrations in F. spiralis may respond to metal exposure when natural processes are vulnerable to pollution. The potential for MT to be used as a biomarker in Fucus spp. has been highlighted, warranting further research to develop a promising cosmopolitan bioindicator for metal pollution.

Text
001 - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (1MB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 14 March 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 1 December 2017
Published date: December 2017
Keywords: metallothionein, metal toxicity, Biomonitoring, brown seaweed, Fucus spiralis

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 416613
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/416613
ISSN: 1929-2732
PURE UUID: ef9e5a7a-f66d-417c-aa3c-a118a36d1781
ORCID for I.D. Williams: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0121-1219

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Jan 2018 17:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 01:51

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: J.F.P. Oaten
Author: M.C. Gibson
Author: M.D. Hudson
Author: A.C. Jensen
Author: I.D. Williams ORCID iD

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×