The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

A comparison of the performances of polypropylene and rubber fibers in completely decomposed granite

A comparison of the performances of polypropylene and rubber fibers in completely decomposed granite
A comparison of the performances of polypropylene and rubber fibers in completely decomposed granite
This fundamental study investigates how two very different types of fibers, very elongated polypropylene fibers with high tensile resistance, and larger rubber fibers with a smaller aspect ratio and low shear and Young's moduli affect the compression and shearing of a soil. The same host soil was used for both types of fibers, a well-graded decomposed granite. As well as providing a realistic base for the study with its well graded nature, the decomposed granite's tendency to contract upon shearing is used to highlight the underlying mechanisms causing any difference in behavior. The soil mixtures were prepared at an optimal fiber content for each kind. The general patterns of behavior of the reinforced soils, such as the stress-dilatancy behavior, and the normal compression and critical state lines, are compared. It is found that the specimens with rubber fibers are initially much less stiff than those with polypropylene fibers, so that they require larger deformations to reach failure. At failure, they can provide as much extra strength as polypropylene fibers if the rubber fiber-soil mixture has been consolidated to a low confining stress, although very much larger quantities are needed, even to the point of being unrealistic for engineering applications. At high confining pressures, the rubber fibers, which have become slack during compression, tend to lose in efficiency. The soil reinforced with polypropylene fibers develops consistently higher strength, but the compressive nature of the base soil has the effect of hindering their full mobilization as would be seen in a dilative soil.
Geosynthetics; Residual soils; Reinforced soils; Laboratory tests
0266-1144
22-28
Fu, R.
8b021309-d937-4a13-b971-843587d9383d
Baudet, Beatrice A.
58dece08-3575-40c8-9e00-d0fcbc375a36
Madhusudhan, B.N.
e139e3d3-2992-4579-b3f0-4eec3ddae98c
Coop, M.R.
6aaea625-4d25-464a-9c0c-d194081640df
Fu, R.
8b021309-d937-4a13-b971-843587d9383d
Baudet, Beatrice A.
58dece08-3575-40c8-9e00-d0fcbc375a36
Madhusudhan, B.N.
e139e3d3-2992-4579-b3f0-4eec3ddae98c
Coop, M.R.
6aaea625-4d25-464a-9c0c-d194081640df

Fu, R., Baudet, Beatrice A., Madhusudhan, B.N. and Coop, M.R. (2018) A comparison of the performances of polypropylene and rubber fibers in completely decomposed granite. Geotextiles and Geomembranes, 46 (1), 22-28. (doi:10.1016/j.geotexmem.2017.09.004).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This fundamental study investigates how two very different types of fibers, very elongated polypropylene fibers with high tensile resistance, and larger rubber fibers with a smaller aspect ratio and low shear and Young's moduli affect the compression and shearing of a soil. The same host soil was used for both types of fibers, a well-graded decomposed granite. As well as providing a realistic base for the study with its well graded nature, the decomposed granite's tendency to contract upon shearing is used to highlight the underlying mechanisms causing any difference in behavior. The soil mixtures were prepared at an optimal fiber content for each kind. The general patterns of behavior of the reinforced soils, such as the stress-dilatancy behavior, and the normal compression and critical state lines, are compared. It is found that the specimens with rubber fibers are initially much less stiff than those with polypropylene fibers, so that they require larger deformations to reach failure. At failure, they can provide as much extra strength as polypropylene fibers if the rubber fiber-soil mixture has been consolidated to a low confining stress, although very much larger quantities are needed, even to the point of being unrealistic for engineering applications. At high confining pressures, the rubber fibers, which have become slack during compression, tend to lose in efficiency. The soil reinforced with polypropylene fibers develops consistently higher strength, but the compressive nature of the base soil has the effect of hindering their full mobilization as would be seen in a dilative soil.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 10 September 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 20 September 2017
Published date: February 2018
Keywords: Geosynthetics; Residual soils; Reinforced soils; Laboratory tests

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 416628
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/416628
ISSN: 0266-1144
PURE UUID: 18670724-a553-4b4f-bc85-5aa117f1578c
ORCID for B.N. Madhusudhan: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2570-5934

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Jan 2018 17:30
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:22

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×