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Assessing an efficient “Instant Acclimation” approximation of dynamic phytoplankton stoichiometry

Assessing an efficient “Instant Acclimation” approximation of dynamic phytoplankton stoichiometry
Assessing an efficient “Instant Acclimation” approximation of dynamic phytoplankton stoichiometry
The variable elemental ratios of carbon to essential nutrients in marine organic matter affect the productivity of marine food-webs and the sequestration of carbon in the deep ocean. It is important that models of these systems are able to correctly reproduce observed trends. “Dynamic Quota” models have achieved some success in this regard, but the computational expense of transporting each state variable in ocean models has prevented many large-scale models from moving beyond a simpler “Fixed Stoichiometry” formulation. This article compares the Dynamic Quota and Fixed Stoichiometry models to a recent “Instant Acclimation” model, which combines the stoichiometric flexibility of the Dynamic Quota model with the computational efficiency of the Fixed Stoichiometry model. The Instant Acclimation model is mathematically equivalent to the Dynamic Quota model at equilibrium, and provides an accurate approximation under a wide range of dynamic conditions. The accuracy and computational efficiency of the Instant Acclimation model recommend it as a candidate for incorporating flexible stoichiometry into marine ecosystem models, especially in situations where the number of model state-variables is restricted.
0142-7873
803-814
Ward, Ben A.
9063af30-e344-4626-9470-8db7c1543d05
Ward, Ben A.
9063af30-e344-4626-9470-8db7c1543d05

Ward, Ben A. (2017) Assessing an efficient “Instant Acclimation” approximation of dynamic phytoplankton stoichiometry. Journal of Plankton Research, 39 (5), 803-814. (doi:10.1093/plankt/fbx040).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The variable elemental ratios of carbon to essential nutrients in marine organic matter affect the productivity of marine food-webs and the sequestration of carbon in the deep ocean. It is important that models of these systems are able to correctly reproduce observed trends. “Dynamic Quota” models have achieved some success in this regard, but the computational expense of transporting each state variable in ocean models has prevented many large-scale models from moving beyond a simpler “Fixed Stoichiometry” formulation. This article compares the Dynamic Quota and Fixed Stoichiometry models to a recent “Instant Acclimation” model, which combines the stoichiometric flexibility of the Dynamic Quota model with the computational efficiency of the Fixed Stoichiometry model. The Instant Acclimation model is mathematically equivalent to the Dynamic Quota model at equilibrium, and provides an accurate approximation under a wide range of dynamic conditions. The accuracy and computational efficiency of the Instant Acclimation model recommend it as a candidate for incorporating flexible stoichiometry into marine ecosystem models, especially in situations where the number of model state-variables is restricted.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 28 June 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 10 August 2017
Published date: 1 September 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 416693
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/416693
ISSN: 0142-7873
PURE UUID: 54283265-7a64-4fd0-b4d9-6a382c29791b

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Jan 2018 17:30
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 19:02

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