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Identifying populations and areas at greatest risk of household food insecurity in England

Identifying populations and areas at greatest risk of household food insecurity in England
Identifying populations and areas at greatest risk of household food insecurity in England
Despite the increasing recognition of household food insecurity as a policy issue, there is currently no routine measurement of food insecurity in the UK. There is nothing to suggest that Government will address this in the near future for all parts of the UK. In which case, policy makers and campaigners might instead seek out consistent and robust measures of the population-level factors which are known to contribute to food insecurity. However, no systematic measures exist, meaning that resources may not be targeted at those areas most in need. This paper presents the first objective estimate of high population-level risk of household food insecurity in English neighbourhoods (4.09% of the population, 95%CI 4.08-4.10) using public data. Estimated geographic distribution of factors contributing to household food insecurity is customisable to local pressures and is adaptable to settings outside of England.
0143-6228
21-31
Smith, Dianna
e859097c-f9f5-4fd0-8b07-59218648e726
Thompson, Claire
12feb2d6-1e5f-481c-aec1-9d1378294744
Harland, Kirk
18a58383-e4ad-479b-87b6-eac8d7bd3e65
Parker, Storm
2916c5f2-c4f9-415f-a1eb-a87b01adbe45
Shelton, Nicola
41057fc9-3eae-468c-b945-3d73568ff610
Smith, Dianna
e859097c-f9f5-4fd0-8b07-59218648e726
Thompson, Claire
12feb2d6-1e5f-481c-aec1-9d1378294744
Harland, Kirk
18a58383-e4ad-479b-87b6-eac8d7bd3e65
Parker, Storm
2916c5f2-c4f9-415f-a1eb-a87b01adbe45
Shelton, Nicola
41057fc9-3eae-468c-b945-3d73568ff610

Smith, Dianna, Thompson, Claire, Harland, Kirk, Parker, Storm and Shelton, Nicola (2018) Identifying populations and areas at greatest risk of household food insecurity in England. Applied Geography, 91, 21-31. (doi:10.1016/j.apgeog.2017.12.022).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Despite the increasing recognition of household food insecurity as a policy issue, there is currently no routine measurement of food insecurity in the UK. There is nothing to suggest that Government will address this in the near future for all parts of the UK. In which case, policy makers and campaigners might instead seek out consistent and robust measures of the population-level factors which are known to contribute to food insecurity. However, no systematic measures exist, meaning that resources may not be targeted at those areas most in need. This paper presents the first objective estimate of high population-level risk of household food insecurity in English neighbourhoods (4.09% of the population, 95%CI 4.08-4.10) using public data. Estimated geographic distribution of factors contributing to household food insecurity is customisable to local pressures and is adaptable to settings outside of England.

Text
Smith et al 2017_Applied Geography - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 23 December 2019.
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 23 December 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 5 January 2018
Published date: February 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 416703
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/416703
ISSN: 0143-6228
PURE UUID: 33911de5-3919-4285-a81b-35eccfc74be2

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Date deposited: 05 Jan 2018 17:30
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 19:03

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Contributors

Author: Dianna Smith
Author: Claire Thompson
Author: Kirk Harland
Author: Storm Parker
Author: Nicola Shelton

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