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Antenatal vaccination against Group B streptococcus: Attitudes of pregnant women and healthcare professionals in the UK to participation in clinical trials and routine implementation

Antenatal vaccination against Group B streptococcus: Attitudes of pregnant women and healthcare professionals in the UK to participation in clinical trials and routine implementation
Antenatal vaccination against Group B streptococcus: Attitudes of pregnant women and healthcare professionals in the UK to participation in clinical trials and routine implementation
Introduction Maternal vaccination is increasingly part of antenatal care in the UK and worldwide. Trials of Group B streptococcus vaccines are ongoing. This study investigated the attitudes of pregnant women and healthcare professionals towards antenatal vaccination, both in routine care and a clinical trial setting.Material and methods Survey of 269 pregnant women, 273 midwives/obstetricians and 97 neonatal doctors across seven sites in the UK assessing attitudes towards antenatal vaccinations, knowledge of Group B streptococcus, a hypothetical Group B streptococcus vaccine, and participation in clinical vaccine trials.Results 68% of pregnant women intended to receive a vaccine during their current pregnancy (183/269) and 43% (of all respondents, 115/269) reported they would be very/fairly likely to accept a vaccine against Group B streptococcus despite only 29% (55/269) knowing what Group B streptococcus was. This increased to 69% after additional information about Group B streptococcus was provided. Twenty-four percent of pregnant women reported they would be likely to take part in a clinical trial of an unlicensed Group B streptococcus vaccine. Fifty-nine percent of maternity professionals and 74% of neonatologists would be likely to recommend participation in a Group B streptococcus vaccine trial to women, with the vast majority (>99%) willing to be involved in such a study. Incentives to take part cited by pregnant women included extra antenatal scans and the opportunity to be tested for Group B streptococcus.Conclusion Pregnant women and healthcare professionals were open to the idea of an antenatal Group B streptococcus vaccine and involvement in clinical trials of such a vaccine. Education and support from midwives would be key to successful implementation.
0001-6349
McQuaid, Fiona
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Jones, Christine
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Stevens, Zoe
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Meddaugh, Gretchen
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O'Sullivan, Catherine
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Donaldson, Beverly
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Hughes, Rhona
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Ford, Carolyn
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Finn, Adam
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Faust, Saul N.
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Gbesemete, Diane
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Bedford, Helen
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Hughes, Stephen
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Varghese, Anu Susan
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Heath, Paul T.
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Snape, Matthew D.
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McQuaid, Fiona
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Jones, Christine
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Stevens, Zoe
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Meddaugh, Gretchen
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O'Sullivan, Catherine
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Donaldson, Beverly
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Hughes, Rhona
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Ford, Carolyn
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Finn, Adam
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Faust, Saul N.
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Gbesemete, Diane
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Bedford, Helen
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Hughes, Stephen
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Varghese, Anu Susan
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Heath, Paul T.
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Snape, Matthew D.
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McQuaid, Fiona, Jones, Christine, Stevens, Zoe, Meddaugh, Gretchen, O'Sullivan, Catherine, Donaldson, Beverly, Hughes, Rhona, Ford, Carolyn, Finn, Adam, Faust, Saul N., Gbesemete, Diane, Bedford, Helen, Hughes, Stephen, Varghese, Anu Susan, Heath, Paul T. and Snape, Matthew D. (2018) Antenatal vaccination against Group B streptococcus: Attitudes of pregnant women and healthcare professionals in the UK to participation in clinical trials and routine implementation. Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica. (doi:10.1111/aogs.13288).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Introduction Maternal vaccination is increasingly part of antenatal care in the UK and worldwide. Trials of Group B streptococcus vaccines are ongoing. This study investigated the attitudes of pregnant women and healthcare professionals towards antenatal vaccination, both in routine care and a clinical trial setting.Material and methods Survey of 269 pregnant women, 273 midwives/obstetricians and 97 neonatal doctors across seven sites in the UK assessing attitudes towards antenatal vaccinations, knowledge of Group B streptococcus, a hypothetical Group B streptococcus vaccine, and participation in clinical vaccine trials.Results 68% of pregnant women intended to receive a vaccine during their current pregnancy (183/269) and 43% (of all respondents, 115/269) reported they would be very/fairly likely to accept a vaccine against Group B streptococcus despite only 29% (55/269) knowing what Group B streptococcus was. This increased to 69% after additional information about Group B streptococcus was provided. Twenty-four percent of pregnant women reported they would be likely to take part in a clinical trial of an unlicensed Group B streptococcus vaccine. Fifty-nine percent of maternity professionals and 74% of neonatologists would be likely to recommend participation in a Group B streptococcus vaccine trial to women, with the vast majority (>99%) willing to be involved in such a study. Incentives to take part cited by pregnant women included extra antenatal scans and the opportunity to be tested for Group B streptococcus.Conclusion Pregnant women and healthcare professionals were open to the idea of an antenatal Group B streptococcus vaccine and involvement in clinical trials of such a vaccine. Education and support from midwives would be key to successful implementation.

Text McQuaid_et_al-2018-Acta_Obstetricia_et_Gynecologica_Scandinavica - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 20 December 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 19 January 2018

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Local EPrints ID: 416713
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/416713
ISSN: 0001-6349
PURE UUID: 1fa99278-ffd8-43f5-abe4-10422c1a072f
ORCID for Christine Jones: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1523-2368
ORCID for Saul N. Faust: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3410-7642

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Date deposited: 05 Jan 2018 17:30
Last modified: 13 Apr 2018 16:31

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Contributors

Author: Fiona McQuaid
Author: Christine Jones ORCID iD
Author: Zoe Stevens
Author: Gretchen Meddaugh
Author: Catherine O'Sullivan
Author: Beverly Donaldson
Author: Rhona Hughes
Author: Carolyn Ford
Author: Adam Finn
Author: Saul N. Faust ORCID iD
Author: Diane Gbesemete
Author: Helen Bedford
Author: Stephen Hughes
Author: Anu Susan Varghese
Author: Paul T. Heath
Author: Matthew D. Snape

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