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The near field boundary of dewatering systems – estimating individual yields for wells operating under gravity flow

The near field boundary of dewatering systems – estimating individual yields for wells operating under gravity flow
The near field boundary of dewatering systems – estimating individual yields for wells operating under gravity flow
The subject of this thesis is the estimation of individual well yields, which is a fundamental part of a multi-well abstraction system design. A literature review of the subject shows that the current best practice for estimating individual well yields has several shortcomings and that further research on the topic is required for individual wells operating under gravity flow. The proposal by Sichardt (1927) for estimating the hydraulic gradient at entry into wells is reviewed and his suggestions are compared to the findings in the field. Pumping test data from eight individual abstraction wells, operating under gravity flow in aquifers having a range of permeability values, are presented. The permeability of the aquifer and the implied hydraulic entry gradient into the well were calculated from the data. The findings also show that Sichardt’s (1927) formula provides reasonable results for permeabilities in the range 1 x 10-5 up to 2.15 x 10-3m/s. For permeability values below 1 x 10-5 m/s Sichardt (1927) a reasonable estimation, but the results need to be used with caution.
University of Southampton
Botha, Christoffel Philippus
1f04a12a-39e1-48d3-92fc-fce23ca73946
Botha, Christoffel Philippus
1f04a12a-39e1-48d3-92fc-fce23ca73946
Powrie, William
600c3f02-00f8-4486-ae4b-b4fc8ec77c3c

Botha, Christoffel Philippus (2017) The near field boundary of dewatering systems – estimating individual yields for wells operating under gravity flow. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 114pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

The subject of this thesis is the estimation of individual well yields, which is a fundamental part of a multi-well abstraction system design. A literature review of the subject shows that the current best practice for estimating individual well yields has several shortcomings and that further research on the topic is required for individual wells operating under gravity flow. The proposal by Sichardt (1927) for estimating the hydraulic gradient at entry into wells is reviewed and his suggestions are compared to the findings in the field. Pumping test data from eight individual abstraction wells, operating under gravity flow in aquifers having a range of permeability values, are presented. The permeability of the aquifer and the implied hydraulic entry gradient into the well were calculated from the data. The findings also show that Sichardt’s (1927) formula provides reasonable results for permeabilities in the range 1 x 10-5 up to 2.15 x 10-3m/s. For permeability values below 1 x 10-5 m/s Sichardt (1927) a reasonable estimation, but the results need to be used with caution.

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Final e-thesis for e-prints (MPhil) BOTHA 23770872 - Accepted Manuscript
Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.
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Published date: December 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 416903
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/416903
PURE UUID: 33abf155-1d1f-4e01-bd32-3fd336773fea
ORCID for William Powrie: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2271-0826

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Date deposited: 12 Jan 2018 17:30
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:52

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Contributors

Author: Christoffel Philippus Botha
Thesis advisor: William Powrie ORCID iD

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