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Haemophilus influenzae infection of human respiratory mucosa in low concentrations of antibiotics

Haemophilus influenzae infection of human respiratory mucosa in low concentrations of antibiotics
Haemophilus influenzae infection of human respiratory mucosa in low concentrations of antibiotics

We examined the effects of 0.25 and 0.5 minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of amoxicillin, loracarbef, and ciprofloxacin on the interaction of a clinical isolate of nontypable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) with human adenoid organ culture. Adenoid tissue was embedded in agar so that only the mucosal surface was exposed. Minimum essential medium containing NTHi with or without antibiotics was added to the organ culture and incubated with 5% CO2 at 37 degrees C for 24 h. The organ cultures (n = 6) were assessed for several parameters by light microscopy (LM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Bacterial viable counts after 24 h were not significantly different in all organ cultures. Compared with uninfected controls at 24 h, infection with NTHi caused significant (p < 0.05) damage to epithelium as assessed by LM: reduced ciliary beat frequency (CBF), disruption of epithelium integrity, and reduced number of ciliated sites. TEM showed extrusion of cells from the epithelial surface, loss of cilia from ciliated cells, cytoplasmic blebbing, and mitochondrial damage. In the presence of 0.25 and 0.5 MIC of all three antibiotics, the mucosal damage was significantly less (p < 0.05). We conclude that in the presence of sub-MIC levels of amoxicillin, loracarbef, and ciprofloxacin, NTHi infection causes less functional (CBF) and structural damage.

Adenoids, Amoxicillin, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Cephalosporins, Child, Preschool, Ciprofloxacin, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Drug Evaluation, Preclinical, Haemophilus Infections, Haemophilus influenzae, Humans, Microbial Sensitivity Tests, Microscopy, Electron, Mucociliary Clearance, Mucous Membrane, Organ Culture Techniques, Respiratory Tract Infections, Comparative Study, Journal Article
0003-0805
201-207
Tsang, K.W.
7bc32883-8dad-4c92-8ffc-074f6708c0aa
Rutman, A.
b06264ba-bff8-4e7b-b3af-868cfe6369e6
Kanthakumar, K.
b0b03b22-5108-4ec8-9884-38c10861da74
Belcher, J.
1103137a-085e-4f85-9323-740ca462d6df
Lund, V.
19b0121c-1518-4cd8-8c2b-be8557320b0f
Roberts, D.E.
331a0c22-821b-42da-ae7f-7b931d94da87
Read, R.C.
b5caca7b-0063-438a-b703-7ecbb6fc2b51
Cole, P.J.
8d93f747-e6ed-4557-89ea-e12e0925bbf3
Wilson, R.
94eba368-b33f-4071-beb6-dac98ef23651
Tsang, K.W.
7bc32883-8dad-4c92-8ffc-074f6708c0aa
Rutman, A.
b06264ba-bff8-4e7b-b3af-868cfe6369e6
Kanthakumar, K.
b0b03b22-5108-4ec8-9884-38c10861da74
Belcher, J.
1103137a-085e-4f85-9323-740ca462d6df
Lund, V.
19b0121c-1518-4cd8-8c2b-be8557320b0f
Roberts, D.E.
331a0c22-821b-42da-ae7f-7b931d94da87
Read, R.C.
b5caca7b-0063-438a-b703-7ecbb6fc2b51
Cole, P.J.
8d93f747-e6ed-4557-89ea-e12e0925bbf3
Wilson, R.
94eba368-b33f-4071-beb6-dac98ef23651

Tsang, K.W., Rutman, A., Kanthakumar, K., Belcher, J., Lund, V., Roberts, D.E., Read, R.C., Cole, P.J. and Wilson, R. (1993) Haemophilus influenzae infection of human respiratory mucosa in low concentrations of antibiotics. American Review of Respiratory Disease, 148 (1), 201-207. (doi:10.1164/ajrccm/148.1.201).

Record type: Article

Abstract

We examined the effects of 0.25 and 0.5 minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of amoxicillin, loracarbef, and ciprofloxacin on the interaction of a clinical isolate of nontypable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) with human adenoid organ culture. Adenoid tissue was embedded in agar so that only the mucosal surface was exposed. Minimum essential medium containing NTHi with or without antibiotics was added to the organ culture and incubated with 5% CO2 at 37 degrees C for 24 h. The organ cultures (n = 6) were assessed for several parameters by light microscopy (LM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Bacterial viable counts after 24 h were not significantly different in all organ cultures. Compared with uninfected controls at 24 h, infection with NTHi caused significant (p < 0.05) damage to epithelium as assessed by LM: reduced ciliary beat frequency (CBF), disruption of epithelium integrity, and reduced number of ciliated sites. TEM showed extrusion of cells from the epithelial surface, loss of cilia from ciliated cells, cytoplasmic blebbing, and mitochondrial damage. In the presence of 0.25 and 0.5 MIC of all three antibiotics, the mucosal damage was significantly less (p < 0.05). We conclude that in the presence of sub-MIC levels of amoxicillin, loracarbef, and ciprofloxacin, NTHi infection causes less functional (CBF) and structural damage.

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More information

Published date: July 1993
Keywords: Adenoids, Amoxicillin, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Cephalosporins, Child, Preschool, Ciprofloxacin, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Drug Evaluation, Preclinical, Haemophilus Infections, Haemophilus influenzae, Humans, Microbial Sensitivity Tests, Microscopy, Electron, Mucociliary Clearance, Mucous Membrane, Organ Culture Techniques, Respiratory Tract Infections, Comparative Study, Journal Article

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 416953
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/416953
ISSN: 0003-0805
PURE UUID: 0ed08c40-db01-48e9-a1ed-239edb21ced2
ORCID for R.C. Read: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4297-6728

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Jan 2018 17:31
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:36

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