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Predicting the intention to use herbal medicines for anxiety symptoms: a model of health behaviour

Predicting the intention to use herbal medicines for anxiety symptoms: a model of health behaviour
Predicting the intention to use herbal medicines for anxiety symptoms: a model of health behaviour
Background: Anxiety is a prevalent mental health condition in the Western world. Adults experiencing anxiety have been found to use a range of herbal medicines to manage anxiety symptoms.

Aim: This study aimed to test a theoretical model based on the theory of planned behaviour that predicted the intention to use herbal medicines for anxiety symptoms, and to identify individual predictors of intention.

Methods: An online survey was conducted with Australian adults who experienced anxiety and used herbal medicines (N = 400). A two-step approach to structural equation modelling was used to test a path model predicting the intention to use herbal medicines.

Results: The model was found to be well-fitting. Attitude, subjective norms, control beliefs and severity of anxiety symptoms each significantly positively predicted intention to use herbal medicines for anxiety symptoms explaining 56% of the variance.

Conclusions: The results suggest that mental health practitioners and policy makers need to ensure people experiencing anxiety have access to accurate and reliable information about herbal medicines to ensure they can effectively manage anxiety symptoms and safely engage in self-care.
0963-8237
McIntyre, Erica
4ca0660d-5b4f-43ee-b384-e75c56a768b7
Saliba, Anthony J.
555423a9-a810-4b8d-9973-fecbf1b685cb
Wiener, Karl K.K.
2a6a6189-7a59-483f-ad54-c727b6269ef2
Bishop, Felicity L.
1f5429c5-325f-4ac4-aae3-6ba85d079928
McIntyre, Erica
4ca0660d-5b4f-43ee-b384-e75c56a768b7
Saliba, Anthony J.
555423a9-a810-4b8d-9973-fecbf1b685cb
Wiener, Karl K.K.
2a6a6189-7a59-483f-ad54-c727b6269ef2
Bishop, Felicity L.
1f5429c5-325f-4ac4-aae3-6ba85d079928

McIntyre, Erica, Saliba, Anthony J., Wiener, Karl K.K. and Bishop, Felicity L. (2017) Predicting the intention to use herbal medicines for anxiety symptoms: a model of health behaviour. Journal of Mental Health. (doi:10.1080/09638237.2017.1417553).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Anxiety is a prevalent mental health condition in the Western world. Adults experiencing anxiety have been found to use a range of herbal medicines to manage anxiety symptoms.

Aim: This study aimed to test a theoretical model based on the theory of planned behaviour that predicted the intention to use herbal medicines for anxiety symptoms, and to identify individual predictors of intention.

Methods: An online survey was conducted with Australian adults who experienced anxiety and used herbal medicines (N = 400). A two-step approach to structural equation modelling was used to test a path model predicting the intention to use herbal medicines.

Results: The model was found to be well-fitting. Attitude, subjective norms, control beliefs and severity of anxiety symptoms each significantly positively predicted intention to use herbal medicines for anxiety symptoms explaining 56% of the variance.

Conclusions: The results suggest that mental health practitioners and policy makers need to ensure people experiencing anxiety have access to accurate and reliable information about herbal medicines to ensure they can effectively manage anxiety symptoms and safely engage in self-care.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 14 November 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 19 December 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 416989
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/416989
ISSN: 0963-8237
PURE UUID: 86704e70-8cae-40a6-b3bf-7e53a5d742fd
ORCID for Felicity L. Bishop: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8737-6662

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Jan 2018 17:30
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:02

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