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Effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa rhamnolipids on mucociliary transport and ciliary beating

Effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa rhamnolipids on mucociliary transport and ciliary beating
Effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa rhamnolipids on mucociliary transport and ciliary beating

Pseudomonas aeruginosa rhamnolipid causes ciliostasis and cell membrane damage to rabbit tissue, is a secretagogue in cats, and inhibits epithelial ion transport in sheep tissue. It could therefore perturb mucociliary clearance. We have investigated the effect of rhamnolipid on mucociliary transport in the anesthetized guinea pig and guinea pig and human respiratory epithelium in vitro. Application of rhamnolipid to the guinea pig tracheal mucosa reduced tracheal mucus velocity (TMV) in vivo in a dose-dependent manner: a 10-microgram bolus caused cessation of TMV without recovery; a 5-micrograms bolus reduced TMV over a period of 2 h by 22.6% (P = 0.037); a 2.5-microgram bolus caused no overall changes in TMV. The ultrastructure of guinea pig tracheal epithelium exposed to 10 micrograms of rhamnolipid in vivo was normal. Application of 1,000 micrograms/ml rhamnolipid had no effect on the ciliary beat frequency (CBF) of guinea pig tracheal rings in vitro after 30 min, but 250 micrograms/ml stopped ciliary beating after 3 h. Treatment with 100 micrograms/ml rhamnolipid caused immediate slowing of the CBF (P less than 0.01) of human nasal brushings (n = 7), which was maintained for 4 h. Mono- and dirhamnolipid had equivalent effects. The CBF of human nasal turbinate organ culture was also slowed by 100 micrograms/ml rhamnolipid, but only after 4 h (CBF test, 9.87 +/- 0.41 Hz; control, 11.48 +/- 0.27 Hz; P less than 0.05, n = 6), and there was subsequent recovery by 14 h.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Animals, Cilia, Glycolipids, Guinea Pigs, Humans, In Vitro Techniques, Mucociliary Clearance, Nasal Mucosa, Pseudomonas Infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Respiratory Tract Infections, Trachea, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
8750-7587
2271-2277
Read, R.C.
b5caca7b-0063-438a-b703-7ecbb6fc2b51
Roberts, P.
c0b2254d-e9cc-4285-82b1-a8a4594a2038
Munro, N.
c849e0fd-c8d5-4c2b-87c5-2d36283c50ec
Rutman, A.
b06264ba-bff8-4e7b-b3af-868cfe6369e6
Hastie, A.
1bc32e71-adf5-4088-b546-4980965f1226
Shryock, T.
c86b4970-89ca-430d-83ef-cab47ed4e3db
Hall, R.
9a3bd7c9-a074-49ca-bb78-be5b5f18c7ac
McDonald-Gibson, W.
531a1ffa-da7c-4bc1-ba3a-66c090c83bae
Lund, V.
19b0121c-1518-4cd8-8c2b-be8557320b0f
Taylor, G.
aca130d8-98fe-4178-82ff-4ae05dddd327
Read, R.C.
b5caca7b-0063-438a-b703-7ecbb6fc2b51
Roberts, P.
c0b2254d-e9cc-4285-82b1-a8a4594a2038
Munro, N.
c849e0fd-c8d5-4c2b-87c5-2d36283c50ec
Rutman, A.
b06264ba-bff8-4e7b-b3af-868cfe6369e6
Hastie, A.
1bc32e71-adf5-4088-b546-4980965f1226
Shryock, T.
c86b4970-89ca-430d-83ef-cab47ed4e3db
Hall, R.
9a3bd7c9-a074-49ca-bb78-be5b5f18c7ac
McDonald-Gibson, W.
531a1ffa-da7c-4bc1-ba3a-66c090c83bae
Lund, V.
19b0121c-1518-4cd8-8c2b-be8557320b0f
Taylor, G.
aca130d8-98fe-4178-82ff-4ae05dddd327

Read, R.C., Roberts, P., Munro, N., Rutman, A., Hastie, A., Shryock, T., Hall, R., McDonald-Gibson, W., Lund, V. and Taylor, G. (1992) Effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa rhamnolipids on mucociliary transport and ciliary beating. Journal of Applied Physiology, 72 (6), 2271-2277. (doi:10.1152/jappl.1992.72.6.2271).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Pseudomonas aeruginosa rhamnolipid causes ciliostasis and cell membrane damage to rabbit tissue, is a secretagogue in cats, and inhibits epithelial ion transport in sheep tissue. It could therefore perturb mucociliary clearance. We have investigated the effect of rhamnolipid on mucociliary transport in the anesthetized guinea pig and guinea pig and human respiratory epithelium in vitro. Application of rhamnolipid to the guinea pig tracheal mucosa reduced tracheal mucus velocity (TMV) in vivo in a dose-dependent manner: a 10-microgram bolus caused cessation of TMV without recovery; a 5-micrograms bolus reduced TMV over a period of 2 h by 22.6% (P = 0.037); a 2.5-microgram bolus caused no overall changes in TMV. The ultrastructure of guinea pig tracheal epithelium exposed to 10 micrograms of rhamnolipid in vivo was normal. Application of 1,000 micrograms/ml rhamnolipid had no effect on the ciliary beat frequency (CBF) of guinea pig tracheal rings in vitro after 30 min, but 250 micrograms/ml stopped ciliary beating after 3 h. Treatment with 100 micrograms/ml rhamnolipid caused immediate slowing of the CBF (P less than 0.01) of human nasal brushings (n = 7), which was maintained for 4 h. Mono- and dirhamnolipid had equivalent effects. The CBF of human nasal turbinate organ culture was also slowed by 100 micrograms/ml rhamnolipid, but only after 4 h (CBF test, 9.87 +/- 0.41 Hz; control, 11.48 +/- 0.27 Hz; P less than 0.05, n = 6), and there was subsequent recovery by 14 h.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

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More information

Published date: June 1992
Keywords: Animals, Cilia, Glycolipids, Guinea Pigs, Humans, In Vitro Techniques, Mucociliary Clearance, Nasal Mucosa, Pseudomonas Infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Respiratory Tract Infections, Trachea, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 417003
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/417003
ISSN: 8750-7587
PURE UUID: c5a13991-b2ce-4525-bb6d-a96030626d91
ORCID for R.C. Read: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4297-6728

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Jan 2018 17:30
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:36

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