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Interaction of capsulate Haemophilus influenzae with human airway mucosa in vitro

Interaction of capsulate Haemophilus influenzae with human airway mucosa in vitro
Interaction of capsulate Haemophilus influenzae with human airway mucosa in vitro

Two pairs of isogenic capsulate and noncapsulate and one pair of capsulate fimbriate and nonfimbriate strains of Haemophilus influenzae type b were studied in an organ culture of human respiratory mucosa. Over 24 h, the numbers of recovered bacteria increased from the original inoculum size of 10(5) to 10(8) CFU/ml. Transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed that noncapsulate organisms caused significant epithelial damage, whereas capsulate strains did not. Association of noncapsulate bacteria with damaged epithelial cells was observed by 14 h of incubation. In contrast, capsulate organisms were associated with a dense, thick, gel-like matrix which was observed above the epithelial surface. These capsulate organisms were not seen to associate with the epithelial surface (by transmission electron microscopy), though they were occasionally seen adhering to cells by scanning electron microscopy. Fimbriate capsulate H. influenzae showed increased adherence to buccal cells compared with nonfimbriate capsulate organisms. There was also association of fimbriate capsulate bacteria with damaged organ culture epithelium in one of four experiments. It is concluded that both capsule and fimbriae affect the interaction of H. influenzae with human airway mucosa in vitro by influencing adherence to and damage of the epithelium.

Bacterial Adhesion, Fimbriae, Bacterial, Haemophilus influenzae, Humans, Mucous Membrane, Nasopharynx, Organ Culture Techniques, Journal Article
0019-9567
3244-3252
Read, R.C.
b5caca7b-0063-438a-b703-7ecbb6fc2b51
Rutman, A.A.
b06264ba-bff8-4e7b-b3af-868cfe6369e6
Jeffery, P.K.
c06724b0-d87f-45e7-86f8-4dc1a12f8877
Lund, V.J.
b04f5441-1bf2-4a03-b0c6-e90c5520bc59
Brain, A.P.
6f66f21b-f604-463f-bc7c-63e9d5811112
Moxon, E.R.
5ce688e1-52bf-4a89-b125-a6183dd09ac6
Cole, P.J.
8d93f747-e6ed-4557-89ea-e12e0925bbf3
Wilson, R.
94eba368-b33f-4071-beb6-dac98ef23651
Read, R.C.
b5caca7b-0063-438a-b703-7ecbb6fc2b51
Rutman, A.A.
b06264ba-bff8-4e7b-b3af-868cfe6369e6
Jeffery, P.K.
c06724b0-d87f-45e7-86f8-4dc1a12f8877
Lund, V.J.
b04f5441-1bf2-4a03-b0c6-e90c5520bc59
Brain, A.P.
6f66f21b-f604-463f-bc7c-63e9d5811112
Moxon, E.R.
5ce688e1-52bf-4a89-b125-a6183dd09ac6
Cole, P.J.
8d93f747-e6ed-4557-89ea-e12e0925bbf3
Wilson, R.
94eba368-b33f-4071-beb6-dac98ef23651

Read, R.C., Rutman, A.A., Jeffery, P.K., Lund, V.J., Brain, A.P., Moxon, E.R., Cole, P.J. and Wilson, R. (1992) Interaction of capsulate Haemophilus influenzae with human airway mucosa in vitro. Infection and Immunity, 60 (8), 3244-3252.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Two pairs of isogenic capsulate and noncapsulate and one pair of capsulate fimbriate and nonfimbriate strains of Haemophilus influenzae type b were studied in an organ culture of human respiratory mucosa. Over 24 h, the numbers of recovered bacteria increased from the original inoculum size of 10(5) to 10(8) CFU/ml. Transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed that noncapsulate organisms caused significant epithelial damage, whereas capsulate strains did not. Association of noncapsulate bacteria with damaged epithelial cells was observed by 14 h of incubation. In contrast, capsulate organisms were associated with a dense, thick, gel-like matrix which was observed above the epithelial surface. These capsulate organisms were not seen to associate with the epithelial surface (by transmission electron microscopy), though they were occasionally seen adhering to cells by scanning electron microscopy. Fimbriate capsulate H. influenzae showed increased adherence to buccal cells compared with nonfimbriate capsulate organisms. There was also association of fimbriate capsulate bacteria with damaged organ culture epithelium in one of four experiments. It is concluded that both capsule and fimbriae affect the interaction of H. influenzae with human airway mucosa in vitro by influencing adherence to and damage of the epithelium.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 5 May 1992
Published date: August 1992
Keywords: Bacterial Adhesion, Fimbriae, Bacterial, Haemophilus influenzae, Humans, Mucous Membrane, Nasopharynx, Organ Culture Techniques, Journal Article

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 417004
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/417004
ISSN: 0019-9567
PURE UUID: e9a12d19-a76e-4299-bd02-251d9656f869
ORCID for R.C. Read: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4297-6728

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Jan 2018 17:30
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:36

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Contributors

Author: R.C. Read ORCID iD
Author: A.A. Rutman
Author: P.K. Jeffery
Author: V.J. Lund
Author: A.P. Brain
Author: E.R. Moxon
Author: P.J. Cole
Author: R. Wilson

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