The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Maximal feeding with active prey-switching: A kill-the-winner functional response and its effect on global diversity and biogeography

Maximal feeding with active prey-switching: A kill-the-winner functional response and its effect on global diversity and biogeography
Maximal feeding with active prey-switching: A kill-the-winner functional response and its effect on global diversity and biogeography
Predators’ switching towards the most abundant prey is a mechanism that stabilizes population dynamics and helps overcome competitive exclusion of species in food webs. Current formulations of active prey-switching, however, display non-maximal feeding in which the predators’ total ingestion decays exponentially with the number prey species (i.e. the diet breadth) even though the total prey biomass stays constant. We analyse three previously published multi-species functional responses which have either active switching or maximal feeding, but not both. We identify the cause of this apparent incompatibility and describe a kill-the-winner formulation that combines active switching with maximal feeding. Active switching is shown to be a community response in which some predators become prey-selective and the formulations with maximal or non-maximal feeding are implicitly assuming different food web configurations. Global simulations using a marine ecosystem model with 64 phytoplankton species belonging to 4 major functional groups show that the species richness and biogeography of phytoplankton are very sensitive to the choice of the functional response for grazing. The phytoplankton biogeography reflects the balance between the competitive abilities for nutrient uptake and the degree of apparent competition which occurs indirectly between species that share a common predator species. The phytoplankton diversity significantly increases when active switching is combined with maximal feeding through predator-mediated coexistence.
0079-6611
93-109
Vallina, S.M.
cd7854ae-5709-4417-b299-fa44b8f07c6c
Ward, B.a.
9063af30-e344-4626-9470-8db7c1543d05
Dutkiewicz, S.
a2255d47-6686-47a1-bdee-5696ffa331c3
Follows, M.J.
12c723bc-f2f8-43f4-a309-bff6885b9c7c
Vallina, S.M.
cd7854ae-5709-4417-b299-fa44b8f07c6c
Ward, B.a.
9063af30-e344-4626-9470-8db7c1543d05
Dutkiewicz, S.
a2255d47-6686-47a1-bdee-5696ffa331c3
Follows, M.J.
12c723bc-f2f8-43f4-a309-bff6885b9c7c

Vallina, S.M., Ward, B.a., Dutkiewicz, S. and Follows, M.J. (2014) Maximal feeding with active prey-switching: A kill-the-winner functional response and its effect on global diversity and biogeography. Progress in Oceanography, 120, 93-109. (doi:10.1016/j.pocean.2013.08.001).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Predators’ switching towards the most abundant prey is a mechanism that stabilizes population dynamics and helps overcome competitive exclusion of species in food webs. Current formulations of active prey-switching, however, display non-maximal feeding in which the predators’ total ingestion decays exponentially with the number prey species (i.e. the diet breadth) even though the total prey biomass stays constant. We analyse three previously published multi-species functional responses which have either active switching or maximal feeding, but not both. We identify the cause of this apparent incompatibility and describe a kill-the-winner formulation that combines active switching with maximal feeding. Active switching is shown to be a community response in which some predators become prey-selective and the formulations with maximal or non-maximal feeding are implicitly assuming different food web configurations. Global simulations using a marine ecosystem model with 64 phytoplankton species belonging to 4 major functional groups show that the species richness and biogeography of phytoplankton are very sensitive to the choice of the functional response for grazing. The phytoplankton biogeography reflects the balance between the competitive abilities for nutrient uptake and the degree of apparent competition which occurs indirectly between species that share a common predator species. The phytoplankton diversity significantly increases when active switching is combined with maximal feeding through predator-mediated coexistence.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 5 September 2013
Published date: 1 January 2014

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 417011
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/417011
ISSN: 0079-6611
PURE UUID: 7edaeab0-8275-4f1b-ae72-6f7dd9d884db

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 Jan 2018 17:30
Last modified: 01 Aug 2018 16:31

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×