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The interaction of Streptococcus pneumoniae with intact human respiratory mucosa in vitro

The interaction of Streptococcus pneumoniae with intact human respiratory mucosa in vitro
The interaction of Streptococcus pneumoniae with intact human respiratory mucosa in vitro

The interaction of Streptococcus pneumoniae with human ciliated upper respiratory mucosa was studied in an agar-embedded organ culture of nasal turbinate tissue, which only exposed the intact epithelial surface and its secretion. The ciliary beat frequency, measured along the edge of the organ culture, was slowed by 13% in the presence of S. pneumoniae after 16 h (p less than 0.05) compared with the control, and by 24% after 24 h (p less than 0.01). Light microscopy showed bacteria in a thickened gelatinous layer, which obscured the surface of the organ culture. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy confirmed the association of bacteria with the gelatinous layer above an epithelial surface which showed only minor changes compared to uninfected control organ cultures. Contact between bacteria and normal or damaged epithelial cells was not seen. S. pneumoniae in organ culture developed projections from their surface, which were not present after broth culture. S. pneumoniae interactions with epithelial-derived secretions, the formation of a thickened gelatinous layer, and the effects of bacterial toxins on ciliary motility, may be important during colonization of the respiratory tract.

Cilia, Epithelium, Humans, Microscopy, Electron, Microscopy, Electron, Scanning, Nasal Mucosa, Organ Culture Techniques, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
0903-1936
576-583
Feldman, C.
f466c1a8-5663-4837-972d-1eb566eff1e5
Read, R.
b5caca7b-0063-438a-b703-7ecbb6fc2b51
Rutman, A.
b06264ba-bff8-4e7b-b3af-868cfe6369e6
Jeffery, P.K.
c06724b0-d87f-45e7-86f8-4dc1a12f8877
Brain, A.
63362eea-9bf1-4bcf-91c8-434156ac03dd
Lund, V.
19b0121c-1518-4cd8-8c2b-be8557320b0f
Mitchell, T.J.
8e203ae1-74f1-4e5a-a049-98a8c69d15f3
Andrew, P.W.
48bbd6aa-7477-44ab-8b68-001b1e5deb5c
Boulnois, G.J.
a06298af-0bf9-4a06-ae2f-9f946d97c8f2
Todd, H.C.
02707687-9f39-4a4c-ad8b-3c5476d8a71e
Feldman, C.
f466c1a8-5663-4837-972d-1eb566eff1e5
Read, R.
b5caca7b-0063-438a-b703-7ecbb6fc2b51
Rutman, A.
b06264ba-bff8-4e7b-b3af-868cfe6369e6
Jeffery, P.K.
c06724b0-d87f-45e7-86f8-4dc1a12f8877
Brain, A.
63362eea-9bf1-4bcf-91c8-434156ac03dd
Lund, V.
19b0121c-1518-4cd8-8c2b-be8557320b0f
Mitchell, T.J.
8e203ae1-74f1-4e5a-a049-98a8c69d15f3
Andrew, P.W.
48bbd6aa-7477-44ab-8b68-001b1e5deb5c
Boulnois, G.J.
a06298af-0bf9-4a06-ae2f-9f946d97c8f2
Todd, H.C.
02707687-9f39-4a4c-ad8b-3c5476d8a71e

Feldman, C., Read, R., Rutman, A., Jeffery, P.K., Brain, A., Lund, V., Mitchell, T.J., Andrew, P.W., Boulnois, G.J. and Todd, H.C. (1992) The interaction of Streptococcus pneumoniae with intact human respiratory mucosa in vitro. European Respiratory Journal, 5 (5), 576-583.

Record type: Article

Abstract

The interaction of Streptococcus pneumoniae with human ciliated upper respiratory mucosa was studied in an agar-embedded organ culture of nasal turbinate tissue, which only exposed the intact epithelial surface and its secretion. The ciliary beat frequency, measured along the edge of the organ culture, was slowed by 13% in the presence of S. pneumoniae after 16 h (p less than 0.05) compared with the control, and by 24% after 24 h (p less than 0.01). Light microscopy showed bacteria in a thickened gelatinous layer, which obscured the surface of the organ culture. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy confirmed the association of bacteria with the gelatinous layer above an epithelial surface which showed only minor changes compared to uninfected control organ cultures. Contact between bacteria and normal or damaged epithelial cells was not seen. S. pneumoniae in organ culture developed projections from their surface, which were not present after broth culture. S. pneumoniae interactions with epithelial-derived secretions, the formation of a thickened gelatinous layer, and the effects of bacterial toxins on ciliary motility, may be important during colonization of the respiratory tract.

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More information

Published date: May 1992
Keywords: Cilia, Epithelium, Humans, Microscopy, Electron, Microscopy, Electron, Scanning, Nasal Mucosa, Organ Culture Techniques, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 417032
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/417032
ISSN: 0903-1936
PURE UUID: b6e1e75e-1b86-44da-99e4-aa36e465e337
ORCID for R. Read: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4297-6728

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 Jan 2018 17:30
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:36

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Contributors

Author: C. Feldman
Author: R. Read ORCID iD
Author: A. Rutman
Author: P.K. Jeffery
Author: A. Brain
Author: V. Lund
Author: T.J. Mitchell
Author: P.W. Andrew
Author: G.J. Boulnois
Author: H.C. Todd

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