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Active Epstein-Barr virus infection in post-viral fatigue syndrome

Active Epstein-Barr virus infection in post-viral fatigue syndrome
Active Epstein-Barr virus infection in post-viral fatigue syndrome

Serological evidence of active infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was found in 25 of 124 patients (20%) with the post-viral fatigue syndrome (PVFS). In another study on the same group of patients around 50% were found to have evidence of chronic enterovirus infection. No overlap was found between those patients with enterovirus infection and those with active EBV infection. We suggest that there are multiple causes of PVFS and that, in the absence of coexisting immunosuppressive disease which may itself reactivate the virus, EBV may be the aetiological agent in a predominantly female subgroup of patients with PVFS. Furthermore, the disease process in this subgroup may be immunopathological in nature.

Adolescent, Adult, Antibodies, Viral, Antigens, Viral, Capsid, Child, Fatigue, Female, Herpesviridae Infections, Herpesvirus 4, Human, Humans, Immunoglobulin G, Immunoglobulin M, Male, Middle Aged, Syndrome, Journal Article
0163-4453
143-150
Hotchin, N.A.
2fac0634-3d9d-4edc-914b-1f77a4e368e0
Read, R.
b5caca7b-0063-438a-b703-7ecbb6fc2b51
Smith, D.G.
05a6f219-a874-4d68-b14c-789e56a17fd5
Crawford, D.H.
f17e4330-3b43-4fc5-a120-cd37a30a1efc
Hotchin, N.A.
2fac0634-3d9d-4edc-914b-1f77a4e368e0
Read, R.
b5caca7b-0063-438a-b703-7ecbb6fc2b51
Smith, D.G.
05a6f219-a874-4d68-b14c-789e56a17fd5
Crawford, D.H.
f17e4330-3b43-4fc5-a120-cd37a30a1efc

Hotchin, N.A., Read, R., Smith, D.G. and Crawford, D.H. (1989) Active Epstein-Barr virus infection in post-viral fatigue syndrome. Journal of Infection, 18 (2), 143-150. (doi:10.1016/S0163-4453(89)91150-X).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Serological evidence of active infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was found in 25 of 124 patients (20%) with the post-viral fatigue syndrome (PVFS). In another study on the same group of patients around 50% were found to have evidence of chronic enterovirus infection. No overlap was found between those patients with enterovirus infection and those with active EBV infection. We suggest that there are multiple causes of PVFS and that, in the absence of coexisting immunosuppressive disease which may itself reactivate the virus, EBV may be the aetiological agent in a predominantly female subgroup of patients with PVFS. Furthermore, the disease process in this subgroup may be immunopathological in nature.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 2 October 1988
Published date: March 1989
Keywords: Adolescent, Adult, Antibodies, Viral, Antigens, Viral, Capsid, Child, Fatigue, Female, Herpesviridae Infections, Herpesvirus 4, Human, Humans, Immunoglobulin G, Immunoglobulin M, Male, Middle Aged, Syndrome, Journal Article

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 417036
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/417036
ISSN: 0163-4453
PURE UUID: c1292e78-08e0-4fff-8209-958873b87e2e
ORCID for R. Read: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4297-6728

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Date deposited: 17 Jan 2018 17:30
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:18

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Contributors

Author: N.A. Hotchin
Author: R. Read ORCID iD
Author: D.G. Smith
Author: D.H. Crawford

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