The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Expression of cannabinoid CB1 receptor mRNA in basal ganglia of normal and parkinsonian human brain

Expression of cannabinoid CB1 receptor mRNA in basal ganglia of normal and parkinsonian human brain
Expression of cannabinoid CB1 receptor mRNA in basal ganglia of normal and parkinsonian human brain

Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to examine the expression of the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor mRNA in post-mortem brain tissue obtained from normal subjects and patients dying with Parkinson's disease. CB(1) receptor mRNA was detected in striatal (nucleus accumbens, caudate nucleus and putamen) and extrastriatal (globus pallidus, substantia nigra) brain regions. In parkinsonian tissue the level of CB(1) receptor mRNA was decreased in the caudate nucleus, anterior dorsal putamen and external segment of the globus pallidus, but remained unchanged in the other brain areas examined. These results show that CB(1) receptor mRNA expression was altered in Parkinson's disease (though the effects of drug treatment can not be ruled out) and indicate that cannabinoid CB(1) receptor mRNA expression was affected by alterations in dopaminergic systems.

Actins, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Basal Ganglia, Female, Globus Pallidus, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Neostriatum, Nucleus Accumbens, Parkinson Disease, RNA, Messenger, Receptor, Cannabinoid, CB1, Reference Values, Substantia Nigra, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
0300-9564
1279-1288
Hurley, M.J.
07b0180f-8e32-4ce1-8185-e046a42ef15a
Mash, D.C.
8306c19c-264c-4b75-b534-39a039208779
Jenner, P.
785c25df-ec64-4181-b057-26dd31cd9d84
Hurley, M.J.
07b0180f-8e32-4ce1-8185-e046a42ef15a
Mash, D.C.
8306c19c-264c-4b75-b534-39a039208779
Jenner, P.
785c25df-ec64-4181-b057-26dd31cd9d84

Hurley, M.J., Mash, D.C. and Jenner, P. (2003) Expression of cannabinoid CB1 receptor mRNA in basal ganglia of normal and parkinsonian human brain. Journal of Neural Transmission, 110 (11), 1279-1288. (doi:10.1007/s00702-003-0033-7).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to examine the expression of the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor mRNA in post-mortem brain tissue obtained from normal subjects and patients dying with Parkinson's disease. CB(1) receptor mRNA was detected in striatal (nucleus accumbens, caudate nucleus and putamen) and extrastriatal (globus pallidus, substantia nigra) brain regions. In parkinsonian tissue the level of CB(1) receptor mRNA was decreased in the caudate nucleus, anterior dorsal putamen and external segment of the globus pallidus, but remained unchanged in the other brain areas examined. These results show that CB(1) receptor mRNA expression was altered in Parkinson's disease (though the effects of drug treatment can not be ruled out) and indicate that cannabinoid CB(1) receptor mRNA expression was affected by alterations in dopaminergic systems.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 23 June 2003
e-pub ahead of print date: 13 August 2003
Published date: November 2003
Keywords: Actins, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Basal Ganglia, Female, Globus Pallidus, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Neostriatum, Nucleus Accumbens, Parkinson Disease, RNA, Messenger, Receptor, Cannabinoid, CB1, Reference Values, Substantia Nigra, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 417074
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/417074
ISSN: 0300-9564
PURE UUID: 38ccdf81-e7d6-43b5-8783-9fdec9082a6e

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Jan 2018 17:30
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 19:08

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×