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Environmental influences: The special case of gender

Environmental influences: The special case of gender
Environmental influences: The special case of gender
Gender differences in prevalence of different psychopathologies are crucial for both the understanding of developmental pathways and for treatment interventions. Understanding why more girls than boys develop depression in adolescence and why more boys than girls develop attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can inform theories of developmental pathways of psychopathology. This chapter reviews existing findings on gender-specific environmental risk factors for psychopathology, covering the most frequently found risk-factor categories: parenting, early life events, exposure to substances/violence, and an area that might have gender-specific impact: school environment. Some studies found that perceived school climate can reduce externalizing and internalizing symptoms in both boys and girls, but reduces relational aggressive behavior mainly in girls. Individually perceived school climate and parental involvement in schooling can have a positive impact on both boys and girls, but girls specifically profit from a positive relationship with their teacher.
335-342
Wiley-Blackwell
Eisenbarth, Hedwig
41af3dcb-da48-402b-a488-49de88e64f0c
Centifanti, Luna
Williams, David
Eisenbarth, Hedwig
41af3dcb-da48-402b-a488-49de88e64f0c
Centifanti, Luna
Williams, David

Eisenbarth, Hedwig (2017) Environmental influences: The special case of gender. In, Centifanti, Luna and Williams, David (eds.) The Wiley Handbook of Developmental Psychopathology. Chichester, UK. Wiley-Blackwell, pp. 335-342. (doi:10.1002/9781118554470.ch16).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

Gender differences in prevalence of different psychopathologies are crucial for both the understanding of developmental pathways and for treatment interventions. Understanding why more girls than boys develop depression in adolescence and why more boys than girls develop attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can inform theories of developmental pathways of psychopathology. This chapter reviews existing findings on gender-specific environmental risk factors for psychopathology, covering the most frequently found risk-factor categories: parenting, early life events, exposure to substances/violence, and an area that might have gender-specific impact: school environment. Some studies found that perceived school climate can reduce externalizing and internalizing symptoms in both boys and girls, but reduces relational aggressive behavior mainly in girls. Individually perceived school climate and parental involvement in schooling can have a positive impact on both boys and girls, but girls specifically profit from a positive relationship with their teacher.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 25 August 2017
Published date: October 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 417104
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/417104
PURE UUID: ae1dfcf6-7fcf-407c-b3ae-27c62de0a729
ORCID for Hedwig Eisenbarth: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0521-2630

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Jan 2018 17:30
Last modified: 10 Nov 2021 03:37

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Contributors

Author: Hedwig Eisenbarth ORCID iD
Editor: Luna Centifanti
Editor: David Williams

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