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Anthropogenic activities promoting the establishment and spread of marine non-indigenous species post-arrival

Anthropogenic activities promoting the establishment and spread of marine non-indigenous species post-arrival
Anthropogenic activities promoting the establishment and spread of marine non-indigenous species post-arrival
When humans transport a species to a location outside its native range, multiple biotic and abiotic factors influence its post-arrival establishment and spread. Abiotic factors such as disturbance and environmental conditions determine the suitability of the new environment for an invader, as well as influence resource availability and ecological succession. Biotic processes such as competition, facilitation, predation and disease can either limit or promote invasion, as can emergent community level traits such as species diversity. Synergies arise when the abiotic and biotic factors controlling invasion success are themselves influenced by anthropogenic activities, such as those associated with coastal urbanization and industrialization. Here we present a review of the major anthropogenic activities that affect the success of non-indigenous species (NIS) post-arrival. We prioritize the factors in terms of their ecological and evolutionary importance, and present potential management actions to reduce NIS success post-arrival. Evidence-based management has the potential to mitigate anthropogenic activities that enhance invasion success. High priority management actions include: 1) the removal, or containment, of legacy contaminants and reduction of new inputs to reduce the competitive advantage that some invaders have in contaminated environments, 2) the redesign of artificial structures to reduce colonization by NIS through eco-engineering, selection of construction materials and the ‘seeding’ of structures with native species to provide a priority advantage, 3) the management of dominant regional transport pathways to ensure that the risk of transporting NIS via our ncreasingly complex transport networks is minimized and 4) the protection and maintenance of biotic resilience in the form of intact living habitats and endemic diversity. Further research is required to advance our understanding of the role of anthropogenic activities in driving post-arrival success of NIS. Such work is vital for developing responsive and mechanistic management plans and ultimately for reducing the impacts of marine invasive species.
389-419
CRC Press
Johnston, Emma L.
850eeb51-7d5c-41f3-8a8a-1660d9a7ca76
Dafforn, Katherine A.
e6ff825c-91f9-4089-890b-02857e0e4c08
Clark, Graeme F.
ee20731b-300a-48e1-accd-50e8f50ff385
Rius, Marc
c4e88345-4b4e-4428-b4b2-37229155f68d
Floerl, Oliver
cad401d7-7f7a-477d-8c67-bfb7130d2f58
Hawkins, S.J.
Evans, A.J.
Dale, A.C.
Firth, L.B.
Hughes, D.J.
Smith, I.P.
Johnston, Emma L.
850eeb51-7d5c-41f3-8a8a-1660d9a7ca76
Dafforn, Katherine A.
e6ff825c-91f9-4089-890b-02857e0e4c08
Clark, Graeme F.
ee20731b-300a-48e1-accd-50e8f50ff385
Rius, Marc
c4e88345-4b4e-4428-b4b2-37229155f68d
Floerl, Oliver
cad401d7-7f7a-477d-8c67-bfb7130d2f58
Hawkins, S.J.
Evans, A.J.
Dale, A.C.
Firth, L.B.
Hughes, D.J.
Smith, I.P.

Johnston, Emma L., Dafforn, Katherine A., Clark, Graeme F., Rius, Marc and Floerl, Oliver (2017) Anthropogenic activities promoting the establishment and spread of marine non-indigenous species post-arrival. In, Hawkins, S.J., Evans, A.J., Dale, A.C., Firth, L.B., Hughes, D.J. and Smith, I.P. (eds.) Oceanography and Marine Biology: An Annual Review. Boca Raton FL. CRC Press, pp. 389-419.

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

When humans transport a species to a location outside its native range, multiple biotic and abiotic factors influence its post-arrival establishment and spread. Abiotic factors such as disturbance and environmental conditions determine the suitability of the new environment for an invader, as well as influence resource availability and ecological succession. Biotic processes such as competition, facilitation, predation and disease can either limit or promote invasion, as can emergent community level traits such as species diversity. Synergies arise when the abiotic and biotic factors controlling invasion success are themselves influenced by anthropogenic activities, such as those associated with coastal urbanization and industrialization. Here we present a review of the major anthropogenic activities that affect the success of non-indigenous species (NIS) post-arrival. We prioritize the factors in terms of their ecological and evolutionary importance, and present potential management actions to reduce NIS success post-arrival. Evidence-based management has the potential to mitigate anthropogenic activities that enhance invasion success. High priority management actions include: 1) the removal, or containment, of legacy contaminants and reduction of new inputs to reduce the competitive advantage that some invaders have in contaminated environments, 2) the redesign of artificial structures to reduce colonization by NIS through eco-engineering, selection of construction materials and the ‘seeding’ of structures with native species to provide a priority advantage, 3) the management of dominant regional transport pathways to ensure that the risk of transporting NIS via our ncreasingly complex transport networks is minimized and 4) the protection and maintenance of biotic resilience in the form of intact living habitats and endemic diversity. Further research is required to advance our understanding of the role of anthropogenic activities in driving post-arrival success of NIS. Such work is vital for developing responsive and mechanistic management plans and ultimately for reducing the impacts of marine invasive species.

Text
Johnston et al 2017 Ocean Mar Biol Ann Rev - Version of Record
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Published date: 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 417149
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/417149
PURE UUID: f9ac214a-9282-4fec-8f46-b197db562f73

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Date deposited: 22 Jan 2018 17:30
Last modified: 21 Nov 2021 10:15

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Contributors

Author: Emma L. Johnston
Author: Katherine A. Dafforn
Author: Graeme F. Clark
Author: Marc Rius
Author: Oliver Floerl
Editor: S.J. Hawkins
Editor: A.J. Evans
Editor: A.C. Dale
Editor: L.B. Firth
Editor: D.J. Hughes
Editor: I.P. Smith

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