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Peptides from tetraspanin CD9 are potent inhibitors of staphylococcus aureus adherence to keratinocytes

Peptides from tetraspanin CD9 are potent inhibitors of staphylococcus aureus adherence to keratinocytes
Peptides from tetraspanin CD9 are potent inhibitors of staphylococcus aureus adherence to keratinocytes

Staphylococcus aureus is one of the primary causative agents of skin and wound infections. As bacterial adherence is essential for infection, blocking this step can reduce invasion of host tissues by pathogens. An anti-adhesion therapy, based on a host membrane protein family, the tetraspanins, has been developed that can inhibit the adhesion of S. aureus to human cells. Synthetic peptides derived from a keratinocyte-expressed tetraspanin, CD9, were tested for anti-adhesive properties and at low nanomolar concentrations were shown to inhibit bacterial adhesion to cultured keratinocytes and to be effective in a tissue engineered model of human skin infection. These potential therapeutics had no effect on keratinocyte viability, migration or proliferation, indicating that they could be a valuable addition to current treatments for skin infection.

Bacterial Adhesion, Bacterial Infections, Cells, Cultured, Cytokines, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Fluorescent Dyes, Humans, Keratinocytes, Peptides, Staphylococcus aureus, Tetraspanins, Tissue Engineering, Journal Article
1932-6203
Ventress, Jennifer K.
01d53f51-463c-40d3-9ecb-b7077932f2ab
Partridge, Lynda J.
b86f2d4e-1661-4562-9aa2-ecb87246bd9a
Read, Robert C.
b5caca7b-0063-438a-b703-7ecbb6fc2b51
Cozens, Daniel
9d9ad74b-c574-49e8-be62-e6e0b04c81ac
MacNeil, Sheila
6641cb7f-ff7e-4faa-84d9-e68ef993fcbd
Monk, Peter N.
20e829a3-5cdf-47da-8aa8-d4f82e8ab7cd
Ventress, Jennifer K.
01d53f51-463c-40d3-9ecb-b7077932f2ab
Partridge, Lynda J.
b86f2d4e-1661-4562-9aa2-ecb87246bd9a
Read, Robert C.
b5caca7b-0063-438a-b703-7ecbb6fc2b51
Cozens, Daniel
9d9ad74b-c574-49e8-be62-e6e0b04c81ac
MacNeil, Sheila
6641cb7f-ff7e-4faa-84d9-e68ef993fcbd
Monk, Peter N.
20e829a3-5cdf-47da-8aa8-d4f82e8ab7cd

Ventress, Jennifer K., Partridge, Lynda J., Read, Robert C., Cozens, Daniel, MacNeil, Sheila and Monk, Peter N. (2016) Peptides from tetraspanin CD9 are potent inhibitors of staphylococcus aureus adherence to keratinocytes. PLoS ONE, 11 (7). (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0160387).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus is one of the primary causative agents of skin and wound infections. As bacterial adherence is essential for infection, blocking this step can reduce invasion of host tissues by pathogens. An anti-adhesion therapy, based on a host membrane protein family, the tetraspanins, has been developed that can inhibit the adhesion of S. aureus to human cells. Synthetic peptides derived from a keratinocyte-expressed tetraspanin, CD9, were tested for anti-adhesive properties and at low nanomolar concentrations were shown to inhibit bacterial adhesion to cultured keratinocytes and to be effective in a tissue engineered model of human skin infection. These potential therapeutics had no effect on keratinocyte viability, migration or proliferation, indicating that they could be a valuable addition to current treatments for skin infection.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 28 July 2016
Published date: 2016
Keywords: Bacterial Adhesion, Bacterial Infections, Cells, Cultured, Cytokines, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Fluorescent Dyes, Humans, Keratinocytes, Peptides, Staphylococcus aureus, Tetraspanins, Tissue Engineering, Journal Article

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 417197
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/417197
ISSN: 1932-6203
PURE UUID: f7645598-2d2d-463f-af72-ddc0bd09b557
ORCID for Robert C. Read: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4297-6728

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Date deposited: 24 Jan 2018 17:30
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 01:37

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