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A systematic review of techniques and effects of self-help interventions for tinnitus: Application of taxonomies from health psychology

A systematic review of techniques and effects of self-help interventions for tinnitus: Application of taxonomies from health psychology
A systematic review of techniques and effects of self-help interventions for tinnitus: Application of taxonomies from health psychology
Objective: Self-help interventions are followed by people independently with minimal or no therapist contact. This review aims to assess the effectiveness of self-help interventions for adults with chronic tinnitus and systematically identify the self-help techniques used.

Design: Systematic review and application of health psychology taxonomies. Electronic database searches were conducted, supplemented by citation searching and hand-searching of key journals. Prospective controlled trials, which used measures of tinnitus distress, functional management, anxiety, depression, and quality of life, were included. Michie et al’s behaviour change techniques (BCTs) taxonomy and Taylor et al’s PRISMS taxonomy of self-management components were applied to describe interventions. Study sample: Five studies were included, providing low-to-moderate levels of evidence.

Results: Randomized controlled trial studies were too few and heterogeneous for meta-analysis to be performed. Studies comparing self-help interventions to therapist-guided interventions and assessing non tinnitus-specific psychosocial outcomes and functional management were lacking. Fifteen BCTs and eight self-management components were identified across interventions.

Conclusions: A lack of high-quality and homogeneous studies meant that confident conclusions could not be drawn regarding the efficacy of self-help interventions for tinnitus. Better reporting and categorization of intervention techniques is needed for replication in research and practice and to facilitate understanding of intervention mechanisms.
tinnitus, self-help, health psychology, Systematic review, Intervention
S79-S89
Greenwell, Kate
4bac64bd-059f-4d7d-90d3-5c0bccb7ffb2
Sereda, Magdalena
ed765297-068c-4c80-ba69-18d67c9085cc
Coulson, Neil
eaee5265-b3a5-4560-a48f-1684bb8e0b59
El Refaie, Amr
6e31c808-4de0-4870-af46-f63f20dab727
Hoare, Derek J.
413e5905-a6f9-44e7-859a-766c9af2cf6d
Greenwell, Kate
4bac64bd-059f-4d7d-90d3-5c0bccb7ffb2
Sereda, Magdalena
ed765297-068c-4c80-ba69-18d67c9085cc
Coulson, Neil
eaee5265-b3a5-4560-a48f-1684bb8e0b59
El Refaie, Amr
6e31c808-4de0-4870-af46-f63f20dab727
Hoare, Derek J.
413e5905-a6f9-44e7-859a-766c9af2cf6d

Greenwell, Kate, Sereda, Magdalena, Coulson, Neil, El Refaie, Amr and Hoare, Derek J. (2016) A systematic review of techniques and effects of self-help interventions for tinnitus: Application of taxonomies from health psychology. International Journal of Audiology, 55 (Suppl 3), S79-S89. (doi:10.3109/14992027.2015.1137363).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective: Self-help interventions are followed by people independently with minimal or no therapist contact. This review aims to assess the effectiveness of self-help interventions for adults with chronic tinnitus and systematically identify the self-help techniques used.

Design: Systematic review and application of health psychology taxonomies. Electronic database searches were conducted, supplemented by citation searching and hand-searching of key journals. Prospective controlled trials, which used measures of tinnitus distress, functional management, anxiety, depression, and quality of life, were included. Michie et al’s behaviour change techniques (BCTs) taxonomy and Taylor et al’s PRISMS taxonomy of self-management components were applied to describe interventions. Study sample: Five studies were included, providing low-to-moderate levels of evidence.

Results: Randomized controlled trial studies were too few and heterogeneous for meta-analysis to be performed. Studies comparing self-help interventions to therapist-guided interventions and assessing non tinnitus-specific psychosocial outcomes and functional management were lacking. Fifteen BCTs and eight self-management components were identified across interventions.

Conclusions: A lack of high-quality and homogeneous studies meant that confident conclusions could not be drawn regarding the efficacy of self-help interventions for tinnitus. Better reporting and categorization of intervention techniques is needed for replication in research and practice and to facilitate understanding of intervention mechanisms.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 22 December 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 5 May 2016
Published date: 2016
Keywords: tinnitus, self-help, health psychology, Systematic review, Intervention

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 417201
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/417201
PURE UUID: daf87d7c-b025-49cf-80be-34cc20f81111
ORCID for Kate Greenwell: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3662-1488

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 Jan 2018 17:32
Last modified: 15 Aug 2019 00:27

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Contributors

Author: Kate Greenwell ORCID iD
Author: Magdalena Sereda
Author: Neil Coulson
Author: Amr El Refaie
Author: Derek J. Hoare

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