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Striatal leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 mRNA is increased in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-lesioned common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) with L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine methyl ester-induced dyskinesia

Striatal leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 mRNA is increased in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-lesioned common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) with L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine methyl ester-induced dyskinesia
Striatal leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 mRNA is increased in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-lesioned common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) with L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine methyl ester-induced dyskinesia

The level of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (Lrrk2) mRNA expression was measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in anterior striatum from normal and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) that had L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine methyl ester (L-DOPA)-induced dyskinesia. The level of striatal Lrrk2 mRNA was increased in MPTP-treated common marmosets that had L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia compared with normal animals that did not receive l-DOPA. Marmosets that exhibited higher levels of dyskinesia had the greatest increase in striatal Lrrk2 mRNA. Lrrk2 mRNA expression was also measured in human striatum and substantia nigra from control subjects and patients dying with Parkinson's disease. In contrast to marmoset tissue, no alteration in Lrrk2 mRNA expression was found in parkinsonian human brain. However, the brain was from patients who had an overall low level of dyskinesia. The correlation between striatal Lrrk2 mRNA levels in MPTP-treated common marmoset striatum and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia indicates that LRRK2 may have a role in the molecular alterations that cause L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia.

Actins, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Animals, Antiparkinson Agents, Callithrix, Data Interpretation, Statistical, Dopamine Agents, Dyskinesia, Drug-Induced, Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel, Female, Humans, Leucine-Rich Repeat Serine-Threonine Protein Kinase-2, Levodopa, MPTP Poisoning, Male, Middle Aged, Neostriatum, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, RNA, Messenger, Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction, Substantia Nigra, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
0953-816X
171-177
Hurley, M.J.
07b0180f-8e32-4ce1-8185-e046a42ef15a
Patel, P.H.
102ed48a-bf89-4317-8fbe-cc2eee4ba01b
Jackson, M.J.
898148b6-b6a2-4e29-8d7b-af8ca8a82b98
Smith, L.A.
733ebc44-77be-4c0f-920c-5dcdf75a3203
Rose, S.
232c2464-efc4-4b5b-a199-4f554a33b3c2
Jenner, P.
785c25df-ec64-4181-b057-26dd31cd9d84
Hurley, M.J.
07b0180f-8e32-4ce1-8185-e046a42ef15a
Patel, P.H.
102ed48a-bf89-4317-8fbe-cc2eee4ba01b
Jackson, M.J.
898148b6-b6a2-4e29-8d7b-af8ca8a82b98
Smith, L.A.
733ebc44-77be-4c0f-920c-5dcdf75a3203
Rose, S.
232c2464-efc4-4b5b-a199-4f554a33b3c2
Jenner, P.
785c25df-ec64-4181-b057-26dd31cd9d84

Hurley, M.J., Patel, P.H., Jackson, M.J., Smith, L.A., Rose, S. and Jenner, P. (2007) Striatal leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 mRNA is increased in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-lesioned common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) with L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine methyl ester-induced dyskinesia. European Journal of Neuroscience, 26 (1), 171-177. (doi:10.1111/j.1460-9568.2007.05638.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The level of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (Lrrk2) mRNA expression was measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in anterior striatum from normal and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) that had L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine methyl ester (L-DOPA)-induced dyskinesia. The level of striatal Lrrk2 mRNA was increased in MPTP-treated common marmosets that had L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia compared with normal animals that did not receive l-DOPA. Marmosets that exhibited higher levels of dyskinesia had the greatest increase in striatal Lrrk2 mRNA. Lrrk2 mRNA expression was also measured in human striatum and substantia nigra from control subjects and patients dying with Parkinson's disease. In contrast to marmoset tissue, no alteration in Lrrk2 mRNA expression was found in parkinsonian human brain. However, the brain was from patients who had an overall low level of dyskinesia. The correlation between striatal Lrrk2 mRNA levels in MPTP-treated common marmoset striatum and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia indicates that LRRK2 may have a role in the molecular alterations that cause L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 21 May 2007
e-pub ahead of print date: 3 July 2007
Published date: July 2007
Keywords: Actins, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Animals, Antiparkinson Agents, Callithrix, Data Interpretation, Statistical, Dopamine Agents, Dyskinesia, Drug-Induced, Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel, Female, Humans, Leucine-Rich Repeat Serine-Threonine Protein Kinase-2, Levodopa, MPTP Poisoning, Male, Middle Aged, Neostriatum, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, RNA, Messenger, Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction, Substantia Nigra, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 417284
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/417284
ISSN: 0953-816X
PURE UUID: 3af2c3aa-1d51-4b9a-ba86-7e95db0796dc

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Date deposited: 26 Jan 2018 17:31
Last modified: 15 Jan 2020 17:44

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