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Does social identity matter in individual alienation? Household-level evidence in post-reform India

Does social identity matter in individual alienation? Household-level evidence in post-reform India
Does social identity matter in individual alienation? Household-level evidence in post-reform India
Does consumption distance as a measure of individual alienation reveal the effect of social identity? Using the central idea of Akerlof's social distance theory, individual distance is calculated from their own group mean consumption and then we examine whether individuals from different social groups - caste and religion - are alienated across the distance distribution. Using India's household-level microdata on consumption expenditure covering
three major survey rounds since the inception of the reform period, we find a non-unique pattern where the marginalised and minority group households tend to be alienated across the distance distribution. However, among them, the households with higher educational attainment become more integrated as re
ected in the interaction effect of education. These results are robust even after controlling for the endogeneity of education. Given this significant group difference in consumption, we undertake a group-level comparison by creating
a counterfactual group through exchanging the characteristics of the privileged group to the marginalised group (or Hindus to non-Hindus), and find that the privileged group still consumes more than the counterfactual marginalised group, explaining around 77% of the estimated average consumption gap at the median quantile in 2011-12 (or 59% for Hindus versus Non-Hindus). This suggests other inherent identity-specific social factors as possible
contributors to within-group alienation (relative to a better-off category) that can only be minimised through promoting education for the marginalised (or minority religion) groups.
0305-750X
154-172
Gupta, Prashant
00cd40b8-22cb-4047-b6a4-28fcc3cc79b2
Mallick, Sushanta
24be23c0-3cb6-44b2-8255-f9204b17d06d
Mishra, Tapas
218ef618-6b3e-471b-a686-15460da145e0
Gupta, Prashant
00cd40b8-22cb-4047-b6a4-28fcc3cc79b2
Mallick, Sushanta
24be23c0-3cb6-44b2-8255-f9204b17d06d
Mishra, Tapas
218ef618-6b3e-471b-a686-15460da145e0

Gupta, Prashant, Mallick, Sushanta and Mishra, Tapas (2018) Does social identity matter in individual alienation? Household-level evidence in post-reform India. World Development, 104, 154-172. (doi:10.1016/j.worlddev.2017.11.007).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Does consumption distance as a measure of individual alienation reveal the effect of social identity? Using the central idea of Akerlof's social distance theory, individual distance is calculated from their own group mean consumption and then we examine whether individuals from different social groups - caste and religion - are alienated across the distance distribution. Using India's household-level microdata on consumption expenditure covering
three major survey rounds since the inception of the reform period, we find a non-unique pattern where the marginalised and minority group households tend to be alienated across the distance distribution. However, among them, the households with higher educational attainment become more integrated as re
ected in the interaction effect of education. These results are robust even after controlling for the endogeneity of education. Given this significant group difference in consumption, we undertake a group-level comparison by creating
a counterfactual group through exchanging the characteristics of the privileged group to the marginalised group (or Hindus to non-Hindus), and find that the privileged group still consumes more than the counterfactual marginalised group, explaining around 77% of the estimated average consumption gap at the median quantile in 2011-12 (or 59% for Hindus versus Non-Hindus). This suggests other inherent identity-specific social factors as possible
contributors to within-group alienation (relative to a better-off category) that can only be minimised through promoting education for the marginalised (or minority religion) groups.

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Accepted/In Press date: 3 November 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 22 December 2017
Published date: April 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 417287
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/417287
ISSN: 0305-750X
PURE UUID: cf766aac-d13e-454f-a99e-c1a6b2b6435a

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Date deposited: 26 Jan 2018 17:31
Last modified: 01 Apr 2018 16:30

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Contributors

Author: Prashant Gupta
Author: Sushanta Mallick
Author: Tapas Mishra

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