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Competitive influence maximization and enhancement of synchronization in populations of non-identical Kuramoto oscillators

Competitive influence maximization and enhancement of synchronization in populations of non-identical Kuramoto oscillators
Competitive influence maximization and enhancement of synchronization in populations of non-identical Kuramoto oscillators
Many networked systems have evolved to optimize performance of function. Much literature has considered optimization of networks by central planning, but investigations of network formation amongst agents connecting to achieve non-aligned goals are comparatively rare. Here we consider the dynamics of synchronization in populations of coupled non-identical oscillators and analyze adaptations in which individual nodes attempt to rewire network topology to optimize node-specific aims. We demonstrate that, even though individual nodes’ goals differ very widely, rewiring rules in which each node attempts to
connect to the rest of the network in such a way as to maximize its influence on the system can enhance synchronization of the collective. The observed speed-up of consensus finding in this competitive dynamics might explain enhanced synchronization in real world systems and shed light on mechanisms for improved consensus finding in society.
2045-2322
Brede, Markus
bbd03865-8e0b-4372-b9d7-cd549631f3f7
Stella, Massimo
37822c93-2522-4bc0-b840-ca32c75efbd7
Kalloniatis, Alexander C.
8ee212af-cddd-4752-ab7b-f21165c3aaf8
Brede, Markus
bbd03865-8e0b-4372-b9d7-cd549631f3f7
Stella, Massimo
37822c93-2522-4bc0-b840-ca32c75efbd7
Kalloniatis, Alexander C.
8ee212af-cddd-4752-ab7b-f21165c3aaf8

Brede, Markus, Stella, Massimo and Kalloniatis, Alexander C. (2018) Competitive influence maximization and enhancement of synchronization in populations of non-identical Kuramoto oscillators. Scientific Reports, 8. (doi:10.1038/s41598-017-18961-z).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Many networked systems have evolved to optimize performance of function. Much literature has considered optimization of networks by central planning, but investigations of network formation amongst agents connecting to achieve non-aligned goals are comparatively rare. Here we consider the dynamics of synchronization in populations of coupled non-identical oscillators and analyze adaptations in which individual nodes attempt to rewire network topology to optimize node-specific aims. We demonstrate that, even though individual nodes’ goals differ very widely, rewiring rules in which each node attempts to
connect to the rest of the network in such a way as to maximize its influence on the system can enhance synchronization of the collective. The observed speed-up of consensus finding in this competitive dynamics might explain enhanced synchronization in real world systems and shed light on mechanisms for improved consensus finding in society.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 15 December 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 15 January 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 417315
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/417315
ISSN: 2045-2322
PURE UUID: ae1892f8-5dc1-4876-adf3-db0a338723f7

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Date deposited: 29 Jan 2018 17:30
Last modified: 03 Feb 2018 17:30

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Contributors

Author: Markus Brede
Author: Massimo Stella
Author: Alexander C. Kalloniatis

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