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Ecological consequences of invasion across the freshwater-marine transition in a warming world

Ecological consequences of invasion across the freshwater-marine transition in a warming world
Ecological consequences of invasion across the freshwater-marine transition in a warming world
The freshwater–marine transition that characterizes an estuarine system can provide multiple entry options for invading species, yet the relative importance of this gradient in determining the functional contribution of invading species has received little attention. The ecological consequences of species invasion are routinely evaluated within a freshwater versus marine context, even though many invasive species can inhabit a wide range of salinities. We investigate the functional consequences of different sizes of Corbicula fluminea—an invasive species able to adapt to a wide range of temperatures and salinity—across the freshwater–marine transition in the presence versus absence of warming. Specifically, we characterize how C. fluminea affect fluid and particle transport, important processes in mediating nutrient cycling (NH4-N, NO3-N, PO4-P). Results showed that sediment particle reworking (bioturbation) tends to be influenced by size and to a lesser extent, temperature and salinity; nutrient concentrations are influenced by different interactions between all variables (salinity, temperature, and size class). Our findings demonstrate the highly context-dependent nature of the ecosystem consequences of invasion and highlight the potential for species to simultaneously occupy multiple components of an ecosystem. Recognizing of this aspect of invasibility is fundamental to management and conservation efforts, particularly as freshwater and marine systems tend to be compartmentalized rather than be treated as a contiguous unit. We conclude that more comprehensive appreciation of the distribution of invasive species across adjacent habitats and different seasons is urgently needed to allow the true extent of biological introductions, and their ecological consequences, to be fully realized.
2045-7758
1-11
Crespo, Daniel
2c07381e-1282-422c-801a-5d620fae7940
Solan, Martin
c28b294a-1db6-4677-8eab-bd8d6221fecf
Leston, Sara
2730a5a2-85b6-400a-8325-0439aac651a0
Pardal, Miguel A.
8af6fe3a-0415-4cdf-9185-c053ad464e10
Dolbeth, Marina
b323a7c9-2464-4da2-9d26-445cfb65e79d
Crespo, Daniel
2c07381e-1282-422c-801a-5d620fae7940
Solan, Martin
c28b294a-1db6-4677-8eab-bd8d6221fecf
Leston, Sara
2730a5a2-85b6-400a-8325-0439aac651a0
Pardal, Miguel A.
8af6fe3a-0415-4cdf-9185-c053ad464e10
Dolbeth, Marina
b323a7c9-2464-4da2-9d26-445cfb65e79d

Crespo, Daniel, Solan, Martin, Leston, Sara, Pardal, Miguel A. and Dolbeth, Marina (2018) Ecological consequences of invasion across the freshwater-marine transition in a warming world. Ecology and Evolution, 1-11. (doi:10.1002/ece3.3652).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The freshwater–marine transition that characterizes an estuarine system can provide multiple entry options for invading species, yet the relative importance of this gradient in determining the functional contribution of invading species has received little attention. The ecological consequences of species invasion are routinely evaluated within a freshwater versus marine context, even though many invasive species can inhabit a wide range of salinities. We investigate the functional consequences of different sizes of Corbicula fluminea—an invasive species able to adapt to a wide range of temperatures and salinity—across the freshwater–marine transition in the presence versus absence of warming. Specifically, we characterize how C. fluminea affect fluid and particle transport, important processes in mediating nutrient cycling (NH4-N, NO3-N, PO4-P). Results showed that sediment particle reworking (bioturbation) tends to be influenced by size and to a lesser extent, temperature and salinity; nutrient concentrations are influenced by different interactions between all variables (salinity, temperature, and size class). Our findings demonstrate the highly context-dependent nature of the ecosystem consequences of invasion and highlight the potential for species to simultaneously occupy multiple components of an ecosystem. Recognizing of this aspect of invasibility is fundamental to management and conservation efforts, particularly as freshwater and marine systems tend to be compartmentalized rather than be treated as a contiguous unit. We conclude that more comprehensive appreciation of the distribution of invasive species across adjacent habitats and different seasons is urgently needed to allow the true extent of biological introductions, and their ecological consequences, to be fully realized.

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Accepted/In Press date: 26 October 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 11 January 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 417348
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/417348
ISSN: 2045-7758
PURE UUID: 072b2a5f-dd24-486c-82fa-fa77571d6ade
ORCID for Martin Solan: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9924-5574

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Date deposited: 30 Jan 2018 17:30
Last modified: 16 Apr 2018 16:31

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Contributors

Author: Daniel Crespo
Author: Martin Solan ORCID iD
Author: Sara Leston
Author: Miguel A. Pardal
Author: Marina Dolbeth

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