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A modelling framework of land-use and transport interaction to assess co-evolution of port and urban development

A modelling framework of land-use and transport interaction to assess co-evolution of port and urban development
A modelling framework of land-use and transport interaction to assess co-evolution of port and urban development
The successes of both port and urban developments in port cities are linked through the spatial organisation (land use) and spatial interaction (transport) between the different functions in the cities. While existing integrated land use and transport models can be used to assess the port–urban interaction in the short-term, they cannot explain how different port cities, over decades or even centuries of development, evolved into their current states and how they might develop over longer planning periods into the future. The main setback of the current models lies in the pre-determinations of the basic spatial unit of the analysis, zones, which is biased towards the current conditions of the urban system. This bias leads current models to have smaller, more detailed zones in presently high activity areas and larger zones in presently low activity areas. The use of pre-determined zoning system will nudge the modelled cities to evolve into their current forms and they therefore cannot be used to explain why the evolution had taken such direction in the first place. Nor does it allow the models to predict the creation of new centres of activities in currently underdeveloped areas. This paper therefore describes a framework for a long-term land-use – transport interaction model and applies it to assess the co-evolution of ports and urban areas in hypothetical port cities. The framework uses a multi-level zoning system which allows a more flexible zoning process to replicate the formation of agglomeration and path dependence from a previously vacant space with a navigable waterfront. The model is run under different waterfront conditions of coastal and inland port cities, under regimes of reactive and proactive transport development, to assess the resulting spatial organisation and spatial interaction of the modelled cities.
Nugraha, Aditya Tafta
df33fa16-daeb-4d68-bd65-c26cda240a5b
Waterson, Ben
60a59616-54f7-4c31-920d-975583953286
Blainey, Simon
ee6198e5-1f89-4f9b-be8e-52cc10e8b3bb
Nugraha, Aditya Tafta
df33fa16-daeb-4d68-bd65-c26cda240a5b
Waterson, Ben
60a59616-54f7-4c31-920d-975583953286
Blainey, Simon
ee6198e5-1f89-4f9b-be8e-52cc10e8b3bb

Nugraha, Aditya Tafta, Waterson, Ben and Blainey, Simon (2018) A modelling framework of land-use and transport interaction to assess co-evolution of port and urban development. 50th Annual Conference of the Universities’ Transport Study Group, London, United Kingdom. 03 - 05 Jan 2018. 13 pp.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The successes of both port and urban developments in port cities are linked through the spatial organisation (land use) and spatial interaction (transport) between the different functions in the cities. While existing integrated land use and transport models can be used to assess the port–urban interaction in the short-term, they cannot explain how different port cities, over decades or even centuries of development, evolved into their current states and how they might develop over longer planning periods into the future. The main setback of the current models lies in the pre-determinations of the basic spatial unit of the analysis, zones, which is biased towards the current conditions of the urban system. This bias leads current models to have smaller, more detailed zones in presently high activity areas and larger zones in presently low activity areas. The use of pre-determined zoning system will nudge the modelled cities to evolve into their current forms and they therefore cannot be used to explain why the evolution had taken such direction in the first place. Nor does it allow the models to predict the creation of new centres of activities in currently underdeveloped areas. This paper therefore describes a framework for a long-term land-use – transport interaction model and applies it to assess the co-evolution of ports and urban areas in hypothetical port cities. The framework uses a multi-level zoning system which allows a more flexible zoning process to replicate the formation of agglomeration and path dependence from a previously vacant space with a navigable waterfront. The model is run under different waterfront conditions of coastal and inland port cities, under regimes of reactive and proactive transport development, to assess the resulting spatial organisation and spatial interaction of the modelled cities.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: January 2018
Venue - Dates: 50th Annual Conference of the Universities’ Transport Study Group, London, United Kingdom, 2018-01-03 - 2018-01-05

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 417361
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/417361
PURE UUID: cbd81b48-0662-4cba-99d7-b28b456298f3
ORCID for Aditya Tafta Nugraha: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4754-4713
ORCID for Ben Waterson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9817-7119
ORCID for Simon Blainey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4249-8110

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 30 Jan 2018 17:30
Last modified: 23 Apr 2018 16:31

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