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Information quality challenges of patient-generated data in clinical practice

Information quality challenges of patient-generated data in clinical practice
Information quality challenges of patient-generated data in clinical practice
A characteristic trend of digital health has been the dramatic increase in patient-generated data being presented to clinicians, which follows from the increased ubiquity of self-tracking practices by individuals, driven, in turn, by the proliferation of self-tracking tools and technologies. Such tools not only make self-tracking easier but also potentially more reliable by automating data collection, curation, and storage. While self-tracking practices themselves have been studied extensively in human–computer interaction literature, little work has yet looked at whether these patient-generated data might be able to support clinical processes, such as providing evidence for diagnoses, treatment monitoring, or postprocedure recovery, and how we can define information quality with respect to self-tracked data. In this article, we present the results of a literature review of empirical studies of self-tracking tools, in which we identify how clinicians perceive quality of information from such tools. In the studies, clinicians perceive several characteristics of information quality relating to accuracy and reliability, completeness, context, patient motivation, and representation. We discuss the issues these present in admitting self-tracked data as evidence for clinical decisions.
self-tracking, quantified self, personalized medicine, information quality, health informatics, clinical decision making
1-13
West, Peter
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Van Kleek, Max
4d869656-cd47-4cdf-9a4f-697fa9ba4105
Giordano, Richard
13c61925-de2b-48ae-beab-6aedac3ed14c
Weal, Mark
e8fd30a6-c060-41c5-b388-ca52c81032a4
Shadbolt, Nigel
5c5acdf4-ad42-49b6-81fe-e9db58c2caf7
West, Peter
f9799b52-f299-41c7-bc6e-bcf15fdc9638
Van Kleek, Max
4d869656-cd47-4cdf-9a4f-697fa9ba4105
Giordano, Richard
13c61925-de2b-48ae-beab-6aedac3ed14c
Weal, Mark
e8fd30a6-c060-41c5-b388-ca52c81032a4
Shadbolt, Nigel
5c5acdf4-ad42-49b6-81fe-e9db58c2caf7

West, Peter, Van Kleek, Max, Giordano, Richard, Weal, Mark and Shadbolt, Nigel (2017) Information quality challenges of patient-generated data in clinical practice. Frontiers in Public Health, 5 (284), 1-13. (doi:10.3389/fpubh.2017.00284).

Record type: Article

Abstract

A characteristic trend of digital health has been the dramatic increase in patient-generated data being presented to clinicians, which follows from the increased ubiquity of self-tracking practices by individuals, driven, in turn, by the proliferation of self-tracking tools and technologies. Such tools not only make self-tracking easier but also potentially more reliable by automating data collection, curation, and storage. While self-tracking practices themselves have been studied extensively in human–computer interaction literature, little work has yet looked at whether these patient-generated data might be able to support clinical processes, such as providing evidence for diagnoses, treatment monitoring, or postprocedure recovery, and how we can define information quality with respect to self-tracked data. In this article, we present the results of a literature review of empirical studies of self-tracking tools, in which we identify how clinicians perceive quality of information from such tools. In the studies, clinicians perceive several characteristics of information quality relating to accuracy and reliability, completeness, context, patient motivation, and representation. We discuss the issues these present in admitting self-tracked data as evidence for clinical decisions.

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Accepted/In Press date: 9 October 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 1 November 2017
Published date: 1 November 2017
Keywords: self-tracking, quantified self, personalized medicine, information quality, health informatics, clinical decision making

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 417551
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/417551
PURE UUID: b4db188e-8409-4c63-a217-31f77aa97a35
ORCID for Peter West: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3605-8744
ORCID for Richard Giordano: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2997-9502
ORCID for Mark Weal: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6251-8786

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Date deposited: 02 Feb 2018 17:31
Last modified: 27 Mar 2019 01:37

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Contributors

Author: Peter West ORCID iD
Author: Max Van Kleek
Author: Mark Weal ORCID iD
Author: Nigel Shadbolt

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