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The effect of active noise control on the effective material properties

The effect of active noise control on the effective material properties
The effect of active noise control on the effective material properties
Active noise control has been used in a variety of applications where it is impractical to achieve significant levels of noise control using traditional passive noise control treatments, for example, at low frequencies. In recent years, a similar performance benefit has been gained through the use of acoustic metamaterials, which achieve levels of noise control performance that are not achievable with naturally occurring materials. The high levels of noise control performance are generally attributable to the dispersive properties of these metamaterials and, as such, their behaviour has generally been evaluated in terms of their effective material properties, such as the effective density and bulk modulus. It is well known that the performance of active noise control systems is also frequency dependent, however, the links between these two advanced noise control strategies have not been extensively investigated. Therefore, this paper presents an investigation into how active noise control systems implemented in a duct modify the effective material properties. This work, therefore, begins to make links between the behaviour of acoustic metamaterials and active noise control systems.
Cheer, Jordan
8e452f50-4c7d-4d4e-913a-34015e99b9dc
Daley, Stephen
53cef7f1-77fa-4a4c-9745-b6a0ba4f42e6
Cheer, Jordan
8e452f50-4c7d-4d4e-913a-34015e99b9dc
Daley, Stephen
53cef7f1-77fa-4a4c-9745-b6a0ba4f42e6

Cheer, Jordan and Daley, Stephen (2017) The effect of active noise control on the effective material properties. 24th International Congress on Sound and Vibration, London, United Kingdom. 23 - 27 Jul 2017. 8 pp .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Active noise control has been used in a variety of applications where it is impractical to achieve significant levels of noise control using traditional passive noise control treatments, for example, at low frequencies. In recent years, a similar performance benefit has been gained through the use of acoustic metamaterials, which achieve levels of noise control performance that are not achievable with naturally occurring materials. The high levels of noise control performance are generally attributable to the dispersive properties of these metamaterials and, as such, their behaviour has generally been evaluated in terms of their effective material properties, such as the effective density and bulk modulus. It is well known that the performance of active noise control systems is also frequency dependent, however, the links between these two advanced noise control strategies have not been extensively investigated. Therefore, this paper presents an investigation into how active noise control systems implemented in a duct modify the effective material properties. This work, therefore, begins to make links between the behaviour of acoustic metamaterials and active noise control systems.

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Effective_properties_of_ANC_System - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Published date: 23 July 2017
Venue - Dates: 24th International Congress on Sound and Vibration, London, United Kingdom, 2017-07-23 - 2017-07-27

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 417554
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/417554
PURE UUID: b51dec39-3c4e-463a-99a5-314f9d202bc6
ORCID for Jordan Cheer: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0552-5506

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Date deposited: 02 Feb 2018 17:31
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 00:45

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