The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Dynamic changes in carbonate chemistry in the microenvironment around single marine phytoplankton cells

Dynamic changes in carbonate chemistry in the microenvironment around single marine phytoplankton cells
Dynamic changes in carbonate chemistry in the microenvironment around single marine phytoplankton cells
Photosynthesis by marine diatoms plays a major role in the global carbon cycle, although the precise mechanisms of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) uptake remain unclear. A lack of direct measurements of carbonate chemistry at the cell surface has led to uncertainty over the underlying membrane transport processes and the role of external carbonic anhydrase (eCA). Here we identify rapid and substantial photosynthesis-driven increases in pH and [CO32−] primarily due to the activity of eCA at the cell surface of the large diatom Odontella sinensis using direct simultaneous microelectrode measurements of pH and CO32− along with modelling of cell surface inorganic carbonate chemistry. Our results show that eCA acts to maintain cell surface CO2 concentrations, making a major contribution to DIC supply in O. sinensis. Carbonate chemistry at the cell surface is therefore highly dynamic and strongly dependent on cell size, morphology and the carbonate chemistry of the bulk seawater.
Chrachri, Abdul
4c8a3ca0-7e80-42f4-a3be-dd2dae8583ba
Hopkinson, Brian M.
0c8443d1-206b-45d6-9aaf-1ca33c142cac
Flynn, Kevin
df344440-de54-4adb-98e1-e176b05991b0
Brownlee, Colin
2af37c1c-b2bf-4832-8370-d9c35e7b3385
Wheeler, Glen L.
80ee477b-ceb3-4051-923c-399098bb746a
Chrachri, Abdul
4c8a3ca0-7e80-42f4-a3be-dd2dae8583ba
Hopkinson, Brian M.
0c8443d1-206b-45d6-9aaf-1ca33c142cac
Flynn, Kevin
df344440-de54-4adb-98e1-e176b05991b0
Brownlee, Colin
2af37c1c-b2bf-4832-8370-d9c35e7b3385
Wheeler, Glen L.
80ee477b-ceb3-4051-923c-399098bb746a

Chrachri, Abdul, Hopkinson, Brian M., Flynn, Kevin, Brownlee, Colin and Wheeler, Glen L. (2018) Dynamic changes in carbonate chemistry in the microenvironment around single marine phytoplankton cells. Nature Communications, 9 (1). (doi:10.1038/s41467-017-02426-y).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Photosynthesis by marine diatoms plays a major role in the global carbon cycle, although the precise mechanisms of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) uptake remain unclear. A lack of direct measurements of carbonate chemistry at the cell surface has led to uncertainty over the underlying membrane transport processes and the role of external carbonic anhydrase (eCA). Here we identify rapid and substantial photosynthesis-driven increases in pH and [CO32−] primarily due to the activity of eCA at the cell surface of the large diatom Odontella sinensis using direct simultaneous microelectrode measurements of pH and CO32− along with modelling of cell surface inorganic carbonate chemistry. Our results show that eCA acts to maintain cell surface CO2 concentrations, making a major contribution to DIC supply in O. sinensis. Carbonate chemistry at the cell surface is therefore highly dynamic and strongly dependent on cell size, morphology and the carbonate chemistry of the bulk seawater.

Text
s41467-017-02426-y - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (1MB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 20 November 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 8 January 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 417688
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/417688
PURE UUID: 00e31db9-66e6-48b9-bdb5-dc3c03ef594d

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Feb 2018 17:30
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 18:54

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Abdul Chrachri
Author: Brian M. Hopkinson
Author: Kevin Flynn
Author: Colin Brownlee
Author: Glen L. Wheeler

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×