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Collaborative IEPs for the education of pupils with profound and multiple learning difficulties

Collaborative IEPs for the education of pupils with profound and multiple learning difficulties
Collaborative IEPs for the education of pupils with profound and multiple learning difficulties
Individual educational plans (IEPs) are considered to be more effective when designed and implemented by a multidisciplinary team. This paper deals with the IEP as a collaborative tool for the education of pupils with profound and multiple learning difficulties (PMLD). Ten pupils with PMLD and the people working around them (e.g. teacher, speech and language therapist (SLT), physiotherapist, parents) were chosen as case studies. The design and implementation of IEPs were examined through IEP document analysis; semi‐structured interviews with teachers, parents and other professionals; observations at the Annual Review Meetings (ARMs); and follow‐up questionnaires to parents after the ARM. The study concludes that IEPs are not used as a tool for collaboration between teachers, parents and other professionals and this is attributed to the nature of the IEP itself. Collaborative changes are needed if IEPs are to be designed and implemented successfully. These changes include the introduction of broad goals, which could be shared between all those working around the child, together with less‐frequent but better‐quality evaluations of IEPs.
0885-6257
339-349
Stroggilos, Vasilis
c3f5776e-d0b6-420f-9e65-730028e939b6
Xanthacou, Yota
c71890e8-6feb-4734-8c9e-9cbcd9ade5eb
Stroggilos, Vasilis
c3f5776e-d0b6-420f-9e65-730028e939b6
Xanthacou, Yota
c71890e8-6feb-4734-8c9e-9cbcd9ade5eb

Stroggilos, Vasilis and Xanthacou, Yota (2007) Collaborative IEPs for the education of pupils with profound and multiple learning difficulties. European Journal of Special Needs Education, 21 (3), 339-349. (doi:10.1080/08856250600810872).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Individual educational plans (IEPs) are considered to be more effective when designed and implemented by a multidisciplinary team. This paper deals with the IEP as a collaborative tool for the education of pupils with profound and multiple learning difficulties (PMLD). Ten pupils with PMLD and the people working around them (e.g. teacher, speech and language therapist (SLT), physiotherapist, parents) were chosen as case studies. The design and implementation of IEPs were examined through IEP document analysis; semi‐structured interviews with teachers, parents and other professionals; observations at the Annual Review Meetings (ARMs); and follow‐up questionnaires to parents after the ARM. The study concludes that IEPs are not used as a tool for collaboration between teachers, parents and other professionals and this is attributed to the nature of the IEP itself. Collaborative changes are needed if IEPs are to be designed and implemented successfully. These changes include the introduction of broad goals, which could be shared between all those working around the child, together with less‐frequent but better‐quality evaluations of IEPs.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 17 February 2007

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 417926
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/417926
ISSN: 0885-6257
PURE UUID: aa2cce18-9e5f-4475-b03a-1260e287e1a2
ORCID for Vasilis Stroggilos: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1754-4306

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Feb 2018 17:30
Last modified: 19 Nov 2019 01:23

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