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Changing Macanese identities in the post-handover era

Changing Macanese identities in the post-handover era
Changing Macanese identities in the post-handover era
On 20 December 1999, Macau closed the chapter of more than four centuries of Portuguese rule and officially became one of the Special Administrative Regions (S.A.R.) of China. During these centuries, a creole culture emerged along with a community of racially mixed individuals, commonly known as the Macanese (Pina Cabral, 2002). While many of them have opted to disaffiliate themselves from the ‘capital of Portugueseness’ (Pina Cabral, 2002:41), for the purpose of conglomerating with and adapting to the major Chinese population in Macau, others remain severely proud of their Macanese identity. By employing a theoretical framework in mixed race studies (Bhabha, 1994; Ali, 2003; Song, 2003), this thesis will explore the Macanese’s identity, language and culture as a consequence of the impact of post‐handover in Macau. The focus will be on how the Macanese, as a racially mixed community, have managed and negotiated their identity, language and culture in this context. The perspectives of positioning will be amplified, since there is an apparent lack of research in Macau.  
By utilising biographical research in qualitative methodology, this thesis examines the Macanese context due to sinicization from the interviews of three sample groups (Category A, Category B and the Category C). The disparities in ages and experiences are specifically arranged to allow their aspirations and perceptions to be explored and discussed as being mixed in the dominating Chinese society.

Despite the consequence of the handover, my results show that younger Macanese are keen to search for new ways to adapt and to preserve their community and cultures from dissipating. Many have acknowledged the significance to look beyond the traditional norms (as previously adopted by the older Macanese generation) and to acquire a receptive attitude with the major Chinese population in order to endure their sustainability in contemporary Macau.
University of Southampton
Cheung Vieira, Margarida
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Cheung Vieira, Margarida
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Leonard, Pauline
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Mcghee, Derek P
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Cheung Vieira, Margarida (2018) Changing Macanese identities in the post-handover era. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 229pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

On 20 December 1999, Macau closed the chapter of more than four centuries of Portuguese rule and officially became one of the Special Administrative Regions (S.A.R.) of China. During these centuries, a creole culture emerged along with a community of racially mixed individuals, commonly known as the Macanese (Pina Cabral, 2002). While many of them have opted to disaffiliate themselves from the ‘capital of Portugueseness’ (Pina Cabral, 2002:41), for the purpose of conglomerating with and adapting to the major Chinese population in Macau, others remain severely proud of their Macanese identity. By employing a theoretical framework in mixed race studies (Bhabha, 1994; Ali, 2003; Song, 2003), this thesis will explore the Macanese’s identity, language and culture as a consequence of the impact of post‐handover in Macau. The focus will be on how the Macanese, as a racially mixed community, have managed and negotiated their identity, language and culture in this context. The perspectives of positioning will be amplified, since there is an apparent lack of research in Macau.  
By utilising biographical research in qualitative methodology, this thesis examines the Macanese context due to sinicization from the interviews of three sample groups (Category A, Category B and the Category C). The disparities in ages and experiences are specifically arranged to allow their aspirations and perceptions to be explored and discussed as being mixed in the dominating Chinese society.

Despite the consequence of the handover, my results show that younger Macanese are keen to search for new ways to adapt and to preserve their community and cultures from dissipating. Many have acknowledged the significance to look beyond the traditional norms (as previously adopted by the older Macanese generation) and to acquire a receptive attitude with the major Chinese population in order to endure their sustainability in contemporary Macau.

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Changing Macanese Identities in the Post-Handover Era - Version of Record
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Published date: September 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 418014
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/418014
PURE UUID: 91d5be0c-2b9f-4f98-a52a-b755efb8e551
ORCID for Margarida Cheung Vieira: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3766-5236
ORCID for Pauline Leonard: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8112-0631
ORCID for Derek P Mcghee: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3226-6300

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 20 Feb 2018 17:30
Last modified: 22 Nov 2021 06:09

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Contributors

Author: Margarida Cheung Vieira ORCID iD
Thesis advisor: Pauline Leonard ORCID iD
Thesis advisor: Derek P Mcghee ORCID iD

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