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Spatial arrangement of faults and opening-mode fractures

Spatial arrangement of faults and opening-mode fractures
Spatial arrangement of faults and opening-mode fractures
Spatial arrangement is a fundamental characteristic of fracture arrays. The pattern of fault and opening-mode fracture positions in space defines structural heterogeneity and anisotropy in a rock volume, governs how faults and fractures affect fluid flow, and impacts our understanding of the initiation, propagation and interactions during the formation of fracture patterns. This special issue highlights recent progress with respect to characterizing and understanding the spatial arrangements of fault and fracture patterns, providing examples over a wide range of scales and structural settings. Five papers describe new methods and improvements of existing techniques to quantify spatial arrangement. One study unravels the time evolution of opening-mode fracture spatial arrangement, which are data needed to compare natural patterns with progressive fracture growth in kinematic and mechanical models. Three papers investigate the role of evolving diagenesis in localizing fractures by mechanical stratigraphy and nine discuss opening-mode fracture spatial arrangement. Two papers show the relevance of complex cluster patterns to unconventional reservoirs through examples of fractures in tight gas sandstone horizontal wells, and a study of fracture arrangement in shale. Four papers demonstrate the roles of folds in fracture localization and the development spatial patterns. One paper models along-fault friction and fluid pressure and their effects on fault-related fracture arrangement. Contributions address deformation band patterns in carbonate rocks and fault size and arrangement above a detachment fault. Three papers describe fault and fracture arrangements in basement terrains, and three document fracture patterns in shale. This collection of papers points toward improvement in field methods, continuing improvements in computer-based data analysis and creation of synthetic fracture patterns, and opportunities for further understanding fault and fracture attributes in the subsurface through coupled spatial, size, and pattern analysis.
0191-8141
2-15
Laubach, S.E.
65a48037-487f-44cc-9875-4f116f266fe4
Lamarche, J
c9964fdb-f93b-47d1-8b14-bcdddfccc758
Gauthier, B.D.M.
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Dunne, W.M.
084de0f4-667e-4106-b6b7-62a1a090ed81
Sanderson, David
5653bc11-b905-4985-8c16-c655b2170ba9
Laubach, S.E.
65a48037-487f-44cc-9875-4f116f266fe4
Lamarche, J
c9964fdb-f93b-47d1-8b14-bcdddfccc758
Gauthier, B.D.M.
8b2bbdb1-26c7-45d3-a64d-ffc6a5b2b64c
Dunne, W.M.
084de0f4-667e-4106-b6b7-62a1a090ed81
Sanderson, David
5653bc11-b905-4985-8c16-c655b2170ba9

Laubach, S.E., Lamarche, J, Gauthier, B.D.M., Dunne, W.M. and Sanderson, David (2018) Spatial arrangement of faults and opening-mode fractures. Journal of Structural Geology, 108, 2-15. (doi:10.1016/j.jsg.2017.08.008).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Spatial arrangement is a fundamental characteristic of fracture arrays. The pattern of fault and opening-mode fracture positions in space defines structural heterogeneity and anisotropy in a rock volume, governs how faults and fractures affect fluid flow, and impacts our understanding of the initiation, propagation and interactions during the formation of fracture patterns. This special issue highlights recent progress with respect to characterizing and understanding the spatial arrangements of fault and fracture patterns, providing examples over a wide range of scales and structural settings. Five papers describe new methods and improvements of existing techniques to quantify spatial arrangement. One study unravels the time evolution of opening-mode fracture spatial arrangement, which are data needed to compare natural patterns with progressive fracture growth in kinematic and mechanical models. Three papers investigate the role of evolving diagenesis in localizing fractures by mechanical stratigraphy and nine discuss opening-mode fracture spatial arrangement. Two papers show the relevance of complex cluster patterns to unconventional reservoirs through examples of fractures in tight gas sandstone horizontal wells, and a study of fracture arrangement in shale. Four papers demonstrate the roles of folds in fracture localization and the development spatial patterns. One paper models along-fault friction and fluid pressure and their effects on fault-related fracture arrangement. Contributions address deformation band patterns in carbonate rocks and fault size and arrangement above a detachment fault. Three papers describe fault and fracture arrangements in basement terrains, and three document fracture patterns in shale. This collection of papers points toward improvement in field methods, continuing improvements in computer-based data analysis and creation of synthetic fracture patterns, and opportunities for further understanding fault and fracture attributes in the subsurface through coupled spatial, size, and pattern analysis.

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Accepted/In Press date: 17 August 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 24 August 2017
Published date: March 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 418019
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/418019
ISSN: 0191-8141
PURE UUID: 6fc3111f-2f4a-4a49-8363-8aed705a3d8c
ORCID for David Sanderson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2144-3527

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Date deposited: 20 Feb 2018 17:31
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 01:43

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