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Relationships between fractures

Relationships between fractures
Relationships between fractures
Fracture systems comprise many fractures that may be grouped into sets based on their orientation, type and relative age. The fractures are often arranged in a network that involves fracture branches that interact with one another. Interacting fractures are termed geometrically coupled when they share an intersection line and/or kinematically coupled when the displacements, stresses and strains of one fracture influences those of the other.

Fracture interactions are characterised in terms of the following. 1) Fracture type: for example, whether they have opening (e.g., joints, veins, dykes), closing (stylolites, compaction bands), shearing (e.g., faults, deformation bands) or mixed-mode displacements. 2) Geometry (e.g., relative orientations) and topology (the arrangement of the fractures, including their connectivity). 3) Chronology: the relative ages of the fractures. 4) Kinematics: the displacement distributions of the interacting fractures. It is also suggested that interaction can be characterised in terms of mechanics, e.g., the effects of the interaction on the stress field. It is insufficient to describe only the components of a fracture network, with fuller understanding coming from determining the interactions between the different components of the network.
0191-8141
41-53
Peacock, D.C.P.
54097ee9-4ba1-4691-836e-f72482e76160
Sanderson, David
5653bc11-b905-4985-8c16-c655b2170ba9
Rotevatn, A.
17a64f3b-b65c-4d25-9455-fe5c3539e38d
Peacock, D.C.P.
54097ee9-4ba1-4691-836e-f72482e76160
Sanderson, David
5653bc11-b905-4985-8c16-c655b2170ba9
Rotevatn, A.
17a64f3b-b65c-4d25-9455-fe5c3539e38d

Peacock, D.C.P., Sanderson, David and Rotevatn, A. (2018) Relationships between fractures. Journal of Structural Geology, 106, 41-53. (doi:10.1016/j.jsg.2017.11.010).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Fracture systems comprise many fractures that may be grouped into sets based on their orientation, type and relative age. The fractures are often arranged in a network that involves fracture branches that interact with one another. Interacting fractures are termed geometrically coupled when they share an intersection line and/or kinematically coupled when the displacements, stresses and strains of one fracture influences those of the other.

Fracture interactions are characterised in terms of the following. 1) Fracture type: for example, whether they have opening (e.g., joints, veins, dykes), closing (stylolites, compaction bands), shearing (e.g., faults, deformation bands) or mixed-mode displacements. 2) Geometry (e.g., relative orientations) and topology (the arrangement of the fractures, including their connectivity). 3) Chronology: the relative ages of the fractures. 4) Kinematics: the displacement distributions of the interacting fractures. It is also suggested that interaction can be characterised in terms of mechanics, e.g., the effects of the interaction on the stress field. It is insufficient to describe only the components of a fracture network, with fuller understanding coming from determining the interactions between the different components of the network.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 19 November 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 21 November 2017
Published date: January 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 418067
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/418067
ISSN: 0191-8141
PURE UUID: f9fcb0aa-2bdd-4251-922c-f9785a4ef0d7
ORCID for David Sanderson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2144-3527

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Feb 2018 17:30
Last modified: 28 Apr 2022 01:59

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Contributors

Author: D.C.P. Peacock
Author: David Sanderson ORCID iD
Author: A. Rotevatn

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