The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Correlated random walks caused by dynamical wavefunction collapse

Correlated random walks caused by dynamical wavefunction collapse
Correlated random walks caused by dynamical wavefunction collapse
Wavefunction collapse models modify Schrödinger’s equation so that it describes the collapse of a superposition of macroscopically distinguishable states as a dynamical process. This provides a basis for the resolution of the quantum measurement problem. An additional generic consequence of the collapse mechanism is that it causes particles to exhibit a tiny random diffusive motion. Here it is shown that for the continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) model—one of the most well developed collapse models—the diffusions of two sufficiently nearby particles are positively correlated. An experimental test of this effect is proposed in which random displacements of pairs of free nanoparticles are measured after they have been simultaneously released from nearby traps. The experiment must be carried out at sufficiently low temperature and pressure in order for the collapse effects to dominate over the ambient environmental noise. It is argued that these constraints can be satisfied by current technologies for a large region of the viable parameter space of the CSL model. The effect disappears as the separation between particles exceeds the CSL length scale. The test therefore provides a means of bounding this length scale.
2045-2322
Bedingham, D.J.
0536cbd1-dcde-42b1-9844-8b5daf3a798d
Ulbricht, H.
5060dd43-2dc1-47f8-9339-c1a26719527d
Bedingham, D.J.
0536cbd1-dcde-42b1-9844-8b5daf3a798d
Ulbricht, H.
5060dd43-2dc1-47f8-9339-c1a26719527d

Bedingham, D.J. and Ulbricht, H. (2015) Correlated random walks caused by dynamical wavefunction collapse. Scientific Reports, 5. (doi:10.1038/srep13380).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Wavefunction collapse models modify Schrödinger’s equation so that it describes the collapse of a superposition of macroscopically distinguishable states as a dynamical process. This provides a basis for the resolution of the quantum measurement problem. An additional generic consequence of the collapse mechanism is that it causes particles to exhibit a tiny random diffusive motion. Here it is shown that for the continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) model—one of the most well developed collapse models—the diffusions of two sufficiently nearby particles are positively correlated. An experimental test of this effect is proposed in which random displacements of pairs of free nanoparticles are measured after they have been simultaneously released from nearby traps. The experiment must be carried out at sufficiently low temperature and pressure in order for the collapse effects to dominate over the ambient environmental noise. It is argued that these constraints can be satisfied by current technologies for a large region of the viable parameter space of the CSL model. The effect disappears as the separation between particles exceeds the CSL length scale. The test therefore provides a means of bounding this length scale.

Text
Correlated random walks...1411.6921 - Accepted Manuscript
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (417kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 24 July 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 25 August 2015

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 418116
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/418116
ISSN: 2045-2322
PURE UUID: d29faff1-40e2-45de-bd08-c749860b98c1

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 Feb 2018 17:30
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 18:52

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×