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A multi-host agent-based model for a zoonotic, vector-borne disease: a case study on Trypanosomiasis in Eastern Province, Zambia

A multi-host agent-based model for a zoonotic, vector-borne disease: a case study on Trypanosomiasis in Eastern Province, Zambia
A multi-host agent-based model for a zoonotic, vector-borne disease: a case study on Trypanosomiasis in Eastern Province, Zambia
Author Summary African trypanosomiasis is a parasitic disease which affects humans and other animals in 36 sub-Saharan African countries. The disease is transmitted by the tsetse fly, and the human form of the diseases is known as sleeping sickness. Infectious disease transmission has traditionally been modelled using techniques that consider the impact on a population as a whole (e.g. compartmentalised models such as SIR). For diseases such as sleeping sickness, which are often prevalent in sparsely populated rural environments, these models don’t always capture the spatial and demographic heterogeneity within an area, and the varying exposure to the disease that this can cause. This research introduces a novel agent-based model to the field, which incorporates spatial data for the Luangwa Valley case study, along with demographic data for its inhabitants. Tsetse and potential human and animal hosts are modelled at the individual level, allowing each contact and infection to be recorded through time. Through modelling at a fine-scale, we can incorporate detailed mechanisms for tsetse birth, feeding, reproduction and death, while considering what demographics, and which locations, have a heightened risk of disease.
1935-2727
Alderton, Simon
ec893713-8c3f-465e-8a22-c719744d9f8c
Macleod, Ewan T.
339781ee-33f7-4dd1-8f28-0854491cb5ef
Anderson, Neil E.
366fb85a-744a-4824-a201-4ce5cffe9e3e
Schaten, Kathrin
adefd1c5-2fec-4966-ae31-4c865e45fbcb
Kuleszo, Joanna
21531f94-aa8b-4a37-82ff-1f81622c43f7
Simuunza, Martin
07638302-eb50-428d-b418-83bcfae9a0c4
Welburn, Susan C.
531d82a4-0190-4ff9-a7bb-576ae38fa0b3
Atkinson, Peter M.
96e96579-56fe-424d-a21c-17b6eed13b0b
Alderton, Simon
ec893713-8c3f-465e-8a22-c719744d9f8c
Macleod, Ewan T.
339781ee-33f7-4dd1-8f28-0854491cb5ef
Anderson, Neil E.
366fb85a-744a-4824-a201-4ce5cffe9e3e
Schaten, Kathrin
adefd1c5-2fec-4966-ae31-4c865e45fbcb
Kuleszo, Joanna
21531f94-aa8b-4a37-82ff-1f81622c43f7
Simuunza, Martin
07638302-eb50-428d-b418-83bcfae9a0c4
Welburn, Susan C.
531d82a4-0190-4ff9-a7bb-576ae38fa0b3
Atkinson, Peter M.
96e96579-56fe-424d-a21c-17b6eed13b0b

Alderton, Simon, Macleod, Ewan T., Anderson, Neil E., Schaten, Kathrin, Kuleszo, Joanna, Simuunza, Martin, Welburn, Susan C. and Atkinson, Peter M. (2016) A multi-host agent-based model for a zoonotic, vector-borne disease: a case study on Trypanosomiasis in Eastern Province, Zambia. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases. (doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0005252).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Author Summary African trypanosomiasis is a parasitic disease which affects humans and other animals in 36 sub-Saharan African countries. The disease is transmitted by the tsetse fly, and the human form of the diseases is known as sleeping sickness. Infectious disease transmission has traditionally been modelled using techniques that consider the impact on a population as a whole (e.g. compartmentalised models such as SIR). For diseases such as sleeping sickness, which are often prevalent in sparsely populated rural environments, these models don’t always capture the spatial and demographic heterogeneity within an area, and the varying exposure to the disease that this can cause. This research introduces a novel agent-based model to the field, which incorporates spatial data for the Luangwa Valley case study, along with demographic data for its inhabitants. Tsetse and potential human and animal hosts are modelled at the individual level, allowing each contact and infection to be recorded through time. Through modelling at a fine-scale, we can incorporate detailed mechanisms for tsetse birth, feeding, reproduction and death, while considering what demographics, and which locations, have a heightened risk of disease.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 13 December 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 27 December 2016
Published date: 27 December 2016

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 418148
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/418148
ISSN: 1935-2727
PURE UUID: f455ef27-7ac7-4d1d-be76-2f7c6a49a5e3
ORCID for Peter M. Atkinson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5489-6880

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 Feb 2018 17:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2019 02:02

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