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An integrated optical fibre device for harsh environment refractometry at indices above silica for monitoring hydrocarbon fuels

An integrated optical fibre device for harsh environment refractometry at indices above silica for monitoring hydrocarbon fuels
An integrated optical fibre device for harsh environment refractometry at indices above silica for monitoring hydrocarbon fuels
Integrated Optical Fibre (IOF) allows for robust planar integration and seamless monolithic coupling. Fabrication is achieved through an adapted Flame Hydrolysis Deposition (FHD) technique, which forms a ruggedized glass alloy between the fibre and planar substrate. It has been previously demonstrated as a low linewidth external cavity lasers diode and a hot-wire anemometer, inherently suitable for harsh environments.

This work looks at implementing the platform for harsh environment refractometry, in particular monitoring hydrocarbon fuels in the C14 to C20 range (e.g. Jet A1 and diesel). The platform uses SMF-28 fibre and direct UV written Bragg gratings to infer refractive index and thus the quality of the fuel. A challenge arises as the refractive index of these fuels are typically greater than the refractive index of the waveguide. Therefore, the guided mode operation of FBG refractometers is unsuitable. This work uniquely reports leaky mode operation and a regression analysis, inferring propagation loss through changes in amplitude of successive gratings. In effect, the proposed methodology utilises the imaginary part of the effective index as opposed to the real part, typically used by such sensors.

Initial results have shown a 350 (dB/cm)/riu sensitivity is achievable above a refractive index of 1.45. This was measured for a SMF-28 fibre wet etched to 30 µm and planarized. Considering a 0.01 dB/cm propagation loss resolution, refractive index changes of the order 10-5 can be approached.

Work will be presented on the fabrication of an IOF platform for refractometers as well as metrics for survivability in harsh environments.
Gray, Alan, Ciaran
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Jantzen, Alexander
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Yoshikawa, Naruo
e033b7fb-4010-4b85-9663-c59ca45b699a
Gow, Paul C.
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Gawith, Corin
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Smith, Peter
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Holmes, Christopher
16306bb8-8a46-4fd7-bb19-a146758e5263
Gray, Alan, Ciaran
fa9f2fca-7e1f-4245-a914-13f18ca5ce89
Jantzen, Alexander
af05e45f-d153-4b8e-ae8b-6474fba5501a
Yoshikawa, Naruo
e033b7fb-4010-4b85-9663-c59ca45b699a
Gow, Paul C.
193394b1-fe2d-41de-a9aa-6de7e5925b18
Gawith, Corin
926665c0-84c7-4a1d-ae19-ee6d7d14c43e
Smith, Peter
8979668a-8b7a-4838-9a74-1a7cfc6665f6
Holmes, Christopher
16306bb8-8a46-4fd7-bb19-a146758e5263

Gray, Alan, Ciaran, Jantzen, Alexander, Yoshikawa, Naruo, Gow, Paul C., Gawith, Corin, Smith, Peter and Holmes, Christopher (2018) An integrated optical fibre device for harsh environment refractometry at indices above silica for monitoring hydrocarbon fuels. SPIE Photonics West United States January 2018, San Francisco, United States. 26 Jan - 02 Feb 2018.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Other)

Abstract

Integrated Optical Fibre (IOF) allows for robust planar integration and seamless monolithic coupling. Fabrication is achieved through an adapted Flame Hydrolysis Deposition (FHD) technique, which forms a ruggedized glass alloy between the fibre and planar substrate. It has been previously demonstrated as a low linewidth external cavity lasers diode and a hot-wire anemometer, inherently suitable for harsh environments.

This work looks at implementing the platform for harsh environment refractometry, in particular monitoring hydrocarbon fuels in the C14 to C20 range (e.g. Jet A1 and diesel). The platform uses SMF-28 fibre and direct UV written Bragg gratings to infer refractive index and thus the quality of the fuel. A challenge arises as the refractive index of these fuels are typically greater than the refractive index of the waveguide. Therefore, the guided mode operation of FBG refractometers is unsuitable. This work uniquely reports leaky mode operation and a regression analysis, inferring propagation loss through changes in amplitude of successive gratings. In effect, the proposed methodology utilises the imaginary part of the effective index as opposed to the real part, typically used by such sensors.

Initial results have shown a 350 (dB/cm)/riu sensitivity is achievable above a refractive index of 1.45. This was measured for a SMF-28 fibre wet etched to 30 µm and planarized. Considering a 0.01 dB/cm propagation loss resolution, refractive index changes of the order 10-5 can be approached.

Work will be presented on the fabrication of an IOF platform for refractometers as well as metrics for survivability in harsh environments.

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Published date: January 2018
Venue - Dates: SPIE Photonics West United States January 2018, San Francisco, United States, 2018-01-26 - 2018-02-02

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 418152
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/418152
PURE UUID: 476d95ee-b450-43d5-86c7-eb11b604e93f
ORCID for Paul C. Gow: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3247-9082
ORCID for Corin Gawith: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3502-3558

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 Feb 2018 17:31
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:48

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