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An exploration of the experience of using calendar reminders for people with dementia and family carers

An exploration of the experience of using calendar reminders for people with dementia and family carers
An exploration of the experience of using calendar reminders for people with dementia and family carers
People with dementia and family carers often use calendars to support time orientation to maintain routine. However, little is known about the use of calendars as a compensatory strategy. This study examines the experience and practicalities of using calendar reminders from the perspective of people with dementia and family carers. Six dyads were recruited and interviewed at home. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis was used to develop a narrative interpreted from an occupational therapy perspective. The themes were reflected on during two subsequent focus groups. Findings suggested that calendars are used either intensively as external memory records or more casually and randomly for reassurance. The familiarity and location of the calendar and its utility to the person with dementia and carer, all contribute to its efficacy. For carers the experience of supporting calendar reminders encompasses practical, cognitive and emotional effort. There was little awareness amongst participants of electronic assistive technology.
1471-3012
Evans, Nina
ec37347f-1715-4563-8de8-ca7d37393443
Collier, Lesley
2ea87419-cbc4-4ef3-95e0-516b510b0cab
Evans, Nina
ec37347f-1715-4563-8de8-ca7d37393443
Collier, Lesley
2ea87419-cbc4-4ef3-95e0-516b510b0cab

Evans, Nina and Collier, Lesley (2017) An exploration of the experience of using calendar reminders for people with dementia and family carers. Dementia, 44. (doi:10.1177/1471301217734916).

Record type: Article

Abstract

People with dementia and family carers often use calendars to support time orientation to maintain routine. However, little is known about the use of calendars as a compensatory strategy. This study examines the experience and practicalities of using calendar reminders from the perspective of people with dementia and family carers. Six dyads were recruited and interviewed at home. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis was used to develop a narrative interpreted from an occupational therapy perspective. The themes were reflected on during two subsequent focus groups. Findings suggested that calendars are used either intensively as external memory records or more casually and randomly for reassurance. The familiarity and location of the calendar and its utility to the person with dementia and carer, all contribute to its efficacy. For carers the experience of supporting calendar reminders encompasses practical, cognitive and emotional effort. There was little awareness amongst participants of electronic assistive technology.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 10 October 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 418193
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/418193
ISSN: 1471-3012
PURE UUID: 10805230-99c0-489a-bff5-9ed8a7eede13
ORCID for Lesley Collier: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3788-3420

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Feb 2018 17:30
Last modified: 25 Nov 2021 19:14

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Contributors

Author: Nina Evans
Author: Lesley Collier ORCID iD

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