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Local deposition assisted laser direct-write technique for fabrication of paper-based microfluidic devices

Local deposition assisted laser direct-write technique for fabrication of paper-based microfluidic devices
Local deposition assisted laser direct-write technique for fabrication of paper-based microfluidic devices
In recent years, the requirements for easy-to-use, low-cost and accurate diagnostic solutions have led to rapid progress in the development of in-vitro point-of-care (POC) diagnostic devices, especially lab-on-chip type POC devices. Paper-based micro-analytical devices, proposed by the Whitesides’ group have gained widespread popularity as alternatives to traditional diagnostics. Several methods such as wax printing, UV lithography etc. have already been reported for creating such fluidic devices in paper. In our previous works, we have demonstrated the usefulness and versatility of a laser direct-write (LDW) technique in the patterning of fluidic devices in porous materials for creation of diagnostic devices and have proved its potential as a technique that can be up-scaled for mass-production of paper-based devices at affordable cost. To further improve, optimise and simplify this approach, we propose the inclusion of a local-deposition procedure that involves the deposition of the photopolymer only at desired locations on the paper platform. As in the schematic (Fig.1) describing the local-deposition assisted LDW setup, the photopolymer is first locally deposited onto the paper substrate via a deposition nozzle at designated locations, and a laser beam subsequently illuminates the deposited patterns to induce curing of the photopolymer. The solidified patterns produced through the curing define the fluidic walls that confine and transport the liquids within the porous substrate. In addition, the non-contact nature of the fabrication process renders the platform substrate unaltered and the device free of contaminants. Furthermore, we show the possibility of creating devices with unique advantages such as the creation of surface-relief structures (Fig.2) that help avoid overflow and hence devices that can handle large volumes.We have demonstrated fabrication speeds of >1m/s making the local-deposition assisted LDW process well-suited for rapid and cost-effective roll-to-roll manufacture of paper-based microfluidic devices for a varied set of applications.
Sones, Collin
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He, Peijun
2e303166-6aa5-4a09-b22e-440d96a54a9f
Katis, Ioannis
f92dfb8f-610d-4877-83f6-fd26a571df12
Galanis, Panagiotis
4457b788-deef-4293-ab39-76f501b9529d
Eason, Robert
e38684c3-d18c-41b9-a4aa-def67283b020
Sones, Collin
9de9d8ee-d394-46a5-80b7-e341c0eed0a8
He, Peijun
2e303166-6aa5-4a09-b22e-440d96a54a9f
Katis, Ioannis
f92dfb8f-610d-4877-83f6-fd26a571df12
Galanis, Panagiotis
4457b788-deef-4293-ab39-76f501b9529d
Eason, Robert
e38684c3-d18c-41b9-a4aa-def67283b020

Sones, Collin, He, Peijun, Katis, Ioannis, Galanis, Panagiotis and Eason, Robert (2018) Local deposition assisted laser direct-write technique for fabrication of paper-based microfluidic devices. Biosensors 2018, Hyatt Regency Miami, United States. 12 - 15 Jun 2018. (In Press)

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)

Abstract

In recent years, the requirements for easy-to-use, low-cost and accurate diagnostic solutions have led to rapid progress in the development of in-vitro point-of-care (POC) diagnostic devices, especially lab-on-chip type POC devices. Paper-based micro-analytical devices, proposed by the Whitesides’ group have gained widespread popularity as alternatives to traditional diagnostics. Several methods such as wax printing, UV lithography etc. have already been reported for creating such fluidic devices in paper. In our previous works, we have demonstrated the usefulness and versatility of a laser direct-write (LDW) technique in the patterning of fluidic devices in porous materials for creation of diagnostic devices and have proved its potential as a technique that can be up-scaled for mass-production of paper-based devices at affordable cost. To further improve, optimise and simplify this approach, we propose the inclusion of a local-deposition procedure that involves the deposition of the photopolymer only at desired locations on the paper platform. As in the schematic (Fig.1) describing the local-deposition assisted LDW setup, the photopolymer is first locally deposited onto the paper substrate via a deposition nozzle at designated locations, and a laser beam subsequently illuminates the deposited patterns to induce curing of the photopolymer. The solidified patterns produced through the curing define the fluidic walls that confine and transport the liquids within the porous substrate. In addition, the non-contact nature of the fabrication process renders the platform substrate unaltered and the device free of contaminants. Furthermore, we show the possibility of creating devices with unique advantages such as the creation of surface-relief structures (Fig.2) that help avoid overflow and hence devices that can handle large volumes.We have demonstrated fabrication speeds of >1m/s making the local-deposition assisted LDW process well-suited for rapid and cost-effective roll-to-roll manufacture of paper-based microfluidic devices for a varied set of applications.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 2018
Venue - Dates: Biosensors 2018, Hyatt Regency Miami, United States, 2018-06-12 - 2018-06-15

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 418282
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/418282
PURE UUID: cbe7c092-215c-4b8d-bfc9-915fd81c5138
ORCID for Ioannis Katis: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2016-557X
ORCID for Panagiotis Galanis: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2028-5803
ORCID for Robert Eason: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9704-2204

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 27 Feb 2018 17:30
Last modified: 08 May 2020 00:40

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