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Evolution through cold and deep waters: the molecular phylogeny of the Lithodidae (Crustacea: Decapoda)

Evolution through cold and deep waters: the molecular phylogeny of the Lithodidae (Crustacea: Decapoda)
Evolution through cold and deep waters: the molecular phylogeny of the Lithodidae (Crustacea: Decapoda)
The objectives of this work are to use gene-sequence data to, assess the hypothesis that the Lithodinae arose from ancestors with uncalcified abdomens in shallow-water of the North-East Pacific, investigate the monophyly and interrelationships of genera within the Lithodinae, and to, estimate the scale and minimum number of biogeographic transitions from the shallow environment to the deep sea and vice versa. To do this, phylogenetic analysis from three mitochondrial and three nuclear markers was conducted using Minimum Evolution, Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian methods. The Lithodinae as defined to include North Pacific genus Cryptolithodes may be paraphyletic, with the Hapalogastrinae and Cryptolithodes as sister taxa. This implies that the soft-bodied abdomen of the Hapalogastrinae might not be plesiomorphic for the Lithodidae. Paralomis, Lopholithodes, Phyllolithodes, Lithodes and Neolithodes share a common ancestor, from which the North Pacific Hapalogastrinae did not descend. Lithodid ancestors are likely to have had a north Pacific, shallow water distribution and to have had planktotrophic larvae. North Pacific genus Paralithodes is paraphyletic; P. brevipes is the most basal member of the genus (as sampled) while P. camtshaticus and P. platypus are more closely related to the genera Lithodes and Neolithodes. Genera Lithodes, Neolithodes and Paralomis (as sampled) are monophyletic if Glyptolithodes is included within Paralomis. Lopholithodes is closely related to, but not included within the Paralomis genus. Paralomis is divided into at least two major lineages: one containing South Atlantic, west African, and Indian Ocean species, and the other containing Pacific and South American species. Several species of Paralomis do not resolve consistently with any other groups sampled, implying a complex and possibly rapid global evolution early in the history of the genus. Relationships within the Lithodes genus vary between analytical methods, suggesting that conclusions may not be stable. Consistently, however, Indian Ocean and Pacific forms – L. murrayi, L. longispina and L. nintokuae form a group separated from Atlantic species such as L. santolla, L. confundens, L. maja and L. ferox.
0028-1042
1-15
Hall, Sally
339ea7e1-71b1-4673-9350-2784fe25f3c7
Thatje, Sven
f1011fe3-1048-40c0-97c1-e93b796e6533
Hall, Sally
339ea7e1-71b1-4673-9350-2784fe25f3c7
Thatje, Sven
f1011fe3-1048-40c0-97c1-e93b796e6533

Hall, Sally and Thatje, Sven (2018) Evolution through cold and deep waters: the molecular phylogeny of the Lithodidae (Crustacea: Decapoda). The Science of Nature, 105 (19), 1-15. (doi:10.1007/s00114-018-1544-2).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The objectives of this work are to use gene-sequence data to, assess the hypothesis that the Lithodinae arose from ancestors with uncalcified abdomens in shallow-water of the North-East Pacific, investigate the monophyly and interrelationships of genera within the Lithodinae, and to, estimate the scale and minimum number of biogeographic transitions from the shallow environment to the deep sea and vice versa. To do this, phylogenetic analysis from three mitochondrial and three nuclear markers was conducted using Minimum Evolution, Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian methods. The Lithodinae as defined to include North Pacific genus Cryptolithodes may be paraphyletic, with the Hapalogastrinae and Cryptolithodes as sister taxa. This implies that the soft-bodied abdomen of the Hapalogastrinae might not be plesiomorphic for the Lithodidae. Paralomis, Lopholithodes, Phyllolithodes, Lithodes and Neolithodes share a common ancestor, from which the North Pacific Hapalogastrinae did not descend. Lithodid ancestors are likely to have had a north Pacific, shallow water distribution and to have had planktotrophic larvae. North Pacific genus Paralithodes is paraphyletic; P. brevipes is the most basal member of the genus (as sampled) while P. camtshaticus and P. platypus are more closely related to the genera Lithodes and Neolithodes. Genera Lithodes, Neolithodes and Paralomis (as sampled) are monophyletic if Glyptolithodes is included within Paralomis. Lopholithodes is closely related to, but not included within the Paralomis genus. Paralomis is divided into at least two major lineages: one containing South Atlantic, west African, and Indian Ocean species, and the other containing Pacific and South American species. Several species of Paralomis do not resolve consistently with any other groups sampled, implying a complex and possibly rapid global evolution early in the history of the genus. Relationships within the Lithodes genus vary between analytical methods, suggesting that conclusions may not be stable. Consistently, however, Indian Ocean and Pacific forms – L. murrayi, L. longispina and L. nintokuae form a group separated from Atlantic species such as L. santolla, L. confundens, L. maja and L. ferox.

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Accepted/In Press date: 6 February 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 27 February 2018
Published date: April 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 418517
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/418517
ISSN: 0028-1042
PURE UUID: d7ff8ddb-a7da-4e7a-8257-4addbe293100

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Date deposited: 09 Mar 2018 17:31
Last modified: 16 Sep 2019 17:03

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Author: Sally Hall
Author: Sven Thatje

University divisions

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