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Enumerating preferred extensions: A case study of human reasoning

Enumerating preferred extensions: A case study of human reasoning
Enumerating preferred extensions: A case study of human reasoning
This paper seeks to better understand the links between human reasoning and preferred extensions as found within formal argumentation, especially in the context of uncertainty. The degree of believability of a conclusion may be associated with the number of preferred extensions in which the conclusion is credulously accepted. We are interested in whether people agree with this evaluation. A set of experiments with human participants is presented to investigate the validity of such an association. Our results show that people tend to agree with the outcome of a version of Thimm’s probabilistic semantics in purely qualitative domains as well as in domains in which conclusions express event likelihood. Furthermore, we are able to characterise this behaviour: the heuristics employed by people in understanding preferred extensions are similar to those employed in understanding probabilities.
Argumentation, Probabilistic semantics, User evaluation
192-210
Springer Verlag
Toniolo, Alice
e54ad578-9232-471a-a5d7-cd3a7bc70872
Norman, Timothy
663e522f-807c-4569-9201-dc141c8eb50d
Oren, Nir
00646ccd-977b-4442-88c7-d18089b26670
Modgil, Sanjay
Oren, Nir
Toni, Francesca
Toniolo, Alice
e54ad578-9232-471a-a5d7-cd3a7bc70872
Norman, Timothy
663e522f-807c-4569-9201-dc141c8eb50d
Oren, Nir
00646ccd-977b-4442-88c7-d18089b26670
Modgil, Sanjay
Oren, Nir
Toni, Francesca

Toniolo, Alice, Norman, Timothy and Oren, Nir (2018) Enumerating preferred extensions: A case study of human reasoning. Modgil, Sanjay, Oren, Nir and Toni, Francesca (eds.) In Theory and Applications of Formal Argumentation. vol. 10757, Springer Verlag. pp. 192-210. (doi:10.1007/978-3-319-75553-3_14).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

This paper seeks to better understand the links between human reasoning and preferred extensions as found within formal argumentation, especially in the context of uncertainty. The degree of believability of a conclusion may be associated with the number of preferred extensions in which the conclusion is credulously accepted. We are interested in whether people agree with this evaluation. A set of experiments with human participants is presented to investigate the validity of such an association. Our results show that people tend to agree with the outcome of a version of Thimm’s probabilistic semantics in purely qualitative domains as well as in domains in which conclusions express event likelihood. Furthermore, we are able to characterise this behaviour: the heuristics employed by people in understanding preferred extensions are similar to those employed in understanding probabilities.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 6 March 2018
Published date: 25 April 2018
Keywords: Argumentation, Probabilistic semantics, User evaluation

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 418585
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/418585
PURE UUID: 914bac21-2096-49cb-ab05-d2d83f4a867e
ORCID for Timothy Norman: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6387-4034

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Mar 2018 17:30
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:19

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